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Strengthening climate information and early warning systems for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change in Guinea

Through the project, "Strengthening climate information and early warning systems for climate resilient development and adaptation to climate change in Guinea", UNDP seeks to support  strengthened national capacities, including the participation of communities to prevent, reduce, mitigate and cope with the impact of the systemic shocks form natural hazards. The project also aims to  to strengthen the capacity of developing countries to mainstream climate change adaptation policies into national development plans.

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Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$5 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$39 million (proposed co-financing)
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Outcomes:
• 1. Enhanced capacity of national hydro-meteorological (NHMS) and environmental institutions to monitor extreme weather and climate change
• 2. Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and mainstreaming CC in the long-term development plans

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1. Enhanced capacity of national hydro-meteorological (NHMS) and environmental institutions to monitor extreme weather and climate change

Outcome 2. Efficient and effective use of hydro-meteorological and environmental information for making early warnings and mainstreaming CC in the long-term development plans

Developing climate resilient livelihoods in the vulnerable watershed in Nepal

Nepal is a land-locked country located in the central Himalayas and has a lateral span of less than 200 kilometers. Nepal is one of the poorest countries in the world, with nearly 70 per cent of the population living on less than US$2 per day. Approximately 85 per cent of Nepalese depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and agriculture is the largest contributor to GDP, with additional benefits from a large tourism sector. Since 1963, UNDP has supported the Government of Nepal and its people in their fight against poverty and pursuit of sustainable development. A major element has entailed helping government agencies, civil society and community groups to develop capacities to better plan and implement effective development programmes. 

This new project, Developing climate resilient livelihoods in the vulnerable watershed in Nepal, will work to ensure that integrated watershed management practices are introduced and scaled up in 3 districts covering 150,000 ha of watershed areas and benefiting 100,000 vulnerable people.

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (84.374999989444 27.848790465193)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$7 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$40 million (proposed co-financing)
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Outcomes:
1. Integrated watershed management framework has been established to address climate change induced floods and droughts.
2. Integrated watershed management practices introduced and scaled up in 3 districts covering 150,000 ha of watershed areas and benefiting 100,000 vulnerable people.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1. Integrated watershed management framework has been established to address climate change induced floods and droughts.

Outcome 2. Integrated watershed management practices introduced and scaled up in 3 districts covering 150,000 ha of watershed areas and benefiting 100,000 vulnerable people.

Community based climate risks management in Chad

The Republic of Chad is dominated by the Saharan desert in its north (covering half of its 1,284,634 km2). The Sahelian ecological zone runs through the center of the country, and is characterized by poor soils and scrubland. In the south, the wetter Sudanian savanna zone is dominated by forest and wooded savannah. The country’s unique position within the Middle Africa region aligns it with both the Congo Basin and the Sahel (as a member of both the Central African Forests Commission [COMIFAC] and the Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel [CILSS]). Landlocked, the country is home to about 11.5 million people (2010 estimate), only 28 per cent of whom live in urban areas (UNFPA, 2010). 

Chad is projected to experience a moderate increase in temperature of between 0.6 and 1.3oC (under a medium warming scenario) by 2023 and 1 to 2.5oC of warming expected by 2050. It is expected that the number of “hot” days and nights will increase, while there will be a decrease in the number of “cold” days and nights (McSweeney et al., 2008; World Bank, n.d.). With respect to precipitation changes, model simulations for the Sahel remain widely divergent; some models estimate that mean annual precipitation could decrease by up to 28 per cent, while others suggest that it could increase by up to 29 per cent by the 2090s. A significant increase in extreme rainfall events (greater than 50 mm in the maximum five-day precipitation) has also been projected—a change that could increase runoff and flooding conditions (McSweeney et al., 2008; World Bank, n.d.).

In response to these expected climate change impacts, the United Nations Development Programme is working with the Government of Chad to implement the "Community-based climate risks management in Chad" project. Project activities will work to build local and national capacity to respond to climate change. 

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$5.2 million (proposed GEF LDCF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$16 million (proposed co-financing)
Project Details: 

The main economic sectors in the country are: industry (responsible for 48.8 per cent of GDP, mostly from petroleum products); services (37.6 per cent of GDP); agriculture (13.6 per cent of GDP, principally cotton and livestock). Although agriculture is not the main economic sector of Chad, more than 80 per cent of the country’s workforce is engaged in this sector (USDS, 2010). Chad is among the poorest countries in the world—ranked 163 out of 169 countries on the UNDP Human Development Index (UNDP 2010). GDP per capita in 2008 was US$770 per year (UNDP, 2010), and only 3 per cent of the population has access to electricity. This low level of electrification places huge pressure on forest resources as wood and charcoal remain the principle sources of energy. Exploitation of these resources is contributing to desertification (OneWorld, 2010).

The main non-climate environmental pressures facing Chad include population growth, deforestation, overgrazing, poaching, erosion, waste pollution (litter), soil pollution, brushfires and ground and surface water pollution. Unsustainable levels of water extraction and population pressures have contributed to Lake Chad’s loss of approximately 90 percent of its surface area in the past 40 years. 

The climate of the northern, Saharan desert region of Chad today is very dry throughout the year. Its central plain is hot and dry, with an intense rainy season mid-June to mid-September. In the southern Sudanian savanna lowlands, the climate is warm and more humid, with an intense rainy season from late May to early October. Temperatures in the country range in the winter from 11 to 20oC, and in the summer from 39 to 45oC. Mean annual temperatures in Chad have increased by 0.7oC since 1960 (McSweeney et al., 2008).

Based on the projected changes to the climate, the following key vulnerabilities were identified in Chad’s National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) released in 2010 (CMEWF, 2010):

  • Agriculture: with 80 per cent of its workforce dependent on agriculture and husbandry, the country is highly vulnerable to climate shifts. It therefore not a surprise that the potential for climate change to bring about a loss of biomass, disappearance of certain crop species, lower yields and increased food deficits is of concern to Chad. Potential outcomes of climate change include reduced agricultural productivity in the south, failed harvests in the Sahelian belt, livestock deaths due to insufficient water resources and reduced fish populations. The length of the growing period could be reduced by more than 20 per cent by 2050, and a near-elimination of rainfed mixed crop/livestock systems could occur within this same timeframe. Of particular concern is the potential for the area suitable for cotton cultivation to be reduced due to economic and climatic reasons. So too is the possible impact of climate change on livestock and pastoralism; Chad projects that climate change could led to abandonment of traditional pastoral zones, modified migration patterns, livestock deaths, loss of genetic diversity, fodder deficits, pressure on protected areas and lower livestock yields.
  • Fisheries:  concerns include an increase in the number of subsistence fishers who have abandoned agriculture and livestock for fishing, migration towards Lake Chad and lower fish stocks.
  • Forest resources: climate change could result in lower vegetation cover, degraded soils, deterioration in the ecosystem services provided by the forests, stronger winds and less rainfall.
  • Freshwater resources: stronger flooding, increased demands on water resources, excessive exploitation, increased evaporation rates and significantly increased extraction (with population growth) are cited as sources of vulnerability.
  • Population: increased pressures for the best land, internal and external migration, rural exodus, and greater pressure on urban structures and services.
  • Transport: degraded road networks and increased transportation costs.
  • Industry: increased difficulty in supplying products and inputs.
  • Human health and nutrition: Chad currently has weak access to basic health services among most of the population, leading in part to low life expectancy  and high mortality rates (infant, children, maternal), and low capacity to address the threat of disease (including respiratory, malaria, diarrhea, cardio-vascular disease, cholera, meningitis, skin and eye diseases). Climate change will place an additional burden on an already vulnerable system.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Outcomes:

1. Community-based early warning system for preparedness against climate related disaster risks
2. Enhancing risks management capacities

Expected Outputs:

1.1 Producing and disseminating relevant and timely climate information to enhance preparedness of national and local stakeholders and threatened communities to act appropriately and effectively in a timely manner in response to climate-related disaster risks. This includes: (i) the establishment of a decentralized, reliable and functioning organizational system for managing climate risk and disasters, and for coordinating response; (ii) the support to the Direction of Water Resources and Meteorology (DREM) to generate bottom-up reliable weather forecasts to disseminate to target population; (iii) the establishment of a communication and dissemination system to reach all end users; and (iii) the training of staff from DREM and other relevant personnel to effectively run the CB-Early Warning system.
2.1 Promote financial risk transfer mechanisms (e.g. combination of microfinance and micro-assurance) to help rural households minimize losses and provide safety nets against climate-related shocks. This includes: (i) structural analysis of market and institutions to determine demand for micro-insurance and related risk-transfer mechanisms; (ii) the selection of schemes and instruments; (iii) the development of clients’ education and capacities; (iii) the testing and evaluating of financial risks mechanisms; and (iv) the development of cross-community peer-review, learning and sharing mechanisms to support replication in other vulnerable communities.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Mame Diop
Regional Technical Advisor
Location: 
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1. Community-based early warning system for preparedness against climate related disaster risks

Outcome 2. Enhancing risks management capacities

Promoting Index-Based Weather Insurance for Small Holder Farmers in Burkina Faso

The United Nations Development Programme is working with the Government of Burkina Faso to develop a project proposal for a new US$4.5 million grant proposal for the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund. The proposed "Promoting Index-Based Weather Insurance for Small Holder Farmers in Burkina Faso" project will include US$19 million in co-financing. The project looks to creating enabling conditions for advancing an index-based weather insurance system in Northern Burkina Faso, pilot an insurance program  for small-scale producers (involved in maize and groudnut production) to minimize the damage induced by climate risks, and capture and disseminate lessons learned from the index-based weather insurance experience.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$4.4 million (Proposed GEF LDCF Grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$19 million (Proposed Co-Financing)
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Expected Outcomes

Outcome 1. Enabling conditions for advancing an index-based weather insurance system in Northern Burkina Faso developed

Outcome 2. Insurance program piloted for small scale producers (involved in maize and groudnut) to minimize the damage induced by climate risks.

Outcome 3. Lessons learned from the Index-based Weather Insurance experience are documented and disseminated

Expected Outputs

Output 1. Review the institutional and policy environment to identify gaps and barriers to implementing IBWI

Output 2. Conduct an assessment of institutional capacities and key actors to be trained (including farmers, insurance companies and government officials)

Output 3. Conduct financial literacy and awareness programs for target beneficiaries on IBWI

Output 4. Engage farmers in a participatory and gender sensitive insurance product design and MRV of losses

Output 5. Build a regular sharing and training platform for all stakeholders (farmers, insurance companies, rural banks, and agriculture input companies)

Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Enabling conditions for advancing an index-based weather insurance system in Northern Burkina Faso developed

Outcome 2 - Insurance program piloted for small scale producers (involved in maize and groudnut) to minimize the damage induced by climate risks

Outcome 3 - Lessons learned from the Index-based Weather Insurance experience are documented and disseminated

De-Risking and Scaling-Up Investment in Energy Efficient Building Retrofits - Armenia

The "De-Risking and Scaling-Up Investment in Energy Efficient Building Retrofits - Armenia" project will build the market for energy efficient building retrofits in Armenia, leading to sizeable energy savings and Green House Gas emission reductions (up to 5.8 million tons of Carbon Dioxide of direct and indirect emission savings over the 20-year equipment lifetimes). It will also lead to green job creation and energy poverty reduction. It will directly benefit over 200,000 people and will catalyse private and public sector investment of approximately US$100 million.

Through this project GCF will invest a US$14 million loan to make energy efficiency loans for building retrofits more affordable. The Municipality of Yerevan will add US$8 million in co-financing. In addition, GCF will provide US$6 million in technical assistance to remove market and policy barriers to building retrofits, with UNDP providing US$1.4 million and the Ministry of Nature Protection US$0.4 million co-funding. The technical assistance will seek to overcome lack of information and awareness about the benefits of retrofitting through the establishment of measurement, reporting and verification measures, the development of policy frameworks. The cost-effective combination of policy and financial de-risking instruments and targeted financial incentives will address market barriers and achieve a risk-return profile for EE building retrofits that can attract private investments.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
210,000 direct beneficiaries, 1700 jobs will be created, 1.4 million tons of carbon will be offset
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$20 million (GCF grant according to GCF website)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$9.8 million (US$8 million from Municipality of Yerevan, US$0.4 million from Ministry of Nature Protection, US$1.4 million from UNDP according to GCF website)
Project Details: 

Armenia is a small, poor, land-locked country in the heart of Eurasia, and is highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Unsustainable energy use in buildings underpins Armenia’s closely intertwined development, security and climate-related challenges. Approximately 30% of Armenian households are energy-poor, where energy poverty (often called ‘fuel poverty’) is defined as households spending more than 10% of their budgets on energy. Some 45% of apartments in multi-family buildings have indoor temperatures in winter below 19°C (i.e. below established international standards for human occupancy). About 50% of energy use in buildings depends on imported fossil fuels, and 4% of CO2 emissions come from energy use in buildings. With this in mind, over 50% of energy can be saved via energy efficient retrofits

Improving energy efficiency (EE) in buildings has been assigned the highest priority in Armenia’s housing, energy and climate strategies, including the country’s Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC), its Third National Communication to the UNFCCC and its UNFCCC Technology Needs Assessment.

UNDP will work with the Government, city administrations, the European Investment Bank, private sector stakeholders, ESCOs and local banks to deploy the most cost-effective combination of policy and financial de-risking instruments and targeted financial incentives to address market barriers and achieve a risk-return profile for energy efficient building retrofits that can attract private investments. The project builds on UNDP’s long experience supporting the Government of Armenia and on UNDP’s de-risking framework for low-carbon investment. It has the full backing of Armenia’s National Designated Authority (NDA) for the GCF, the UNFCCC National Focal Point, and the Municipality of Yerevan (home to one-third of Armenia’s population). The project is fully consistent with Armenia’s INDC.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Component 1 will establish building sector Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) and knowledge management. One of the identified barriers is a lack of information and awareness: energy efficiency is not a major concern for most people in Armenia. There is a low level of awareness among building owners, real estate agencies and occupants about operational costs and potential energy- and money-saving opportunities. There is also a misinformed perception that full compliance with efficient building codes and energy-efficient buildings would be prohibitively expensive in Armenia. The market for EE products and services is immature. Robust MRV will build the investment case for energy efficiency retrofits and, together with the dissemination of information, will support the communication of the financial and development gains to be made from energy efficiency investments, thus improving information availability and awareness of the benefits of buildings with improved energy performance.

Component 2 will support national, sub-national and local authorities to adopt and implement an enabling policy framework for energy efficiency retrofits. This will remove a number of policy, legal and institutional barriers through supporting legal reform, the introduction and implementation of regulation, and the modernisation and enforcement of standards. Component 2 will also remove technical and capacity barriers by providing technical assistance to selected market players, such as building owners / managers / owner associations and local government.

Component 3 will provide access to affordable capital for energy efficiency retrofits. This will help remove financial barriers, such as the fact that home-owners and public sector entities lack the financial resources necessary to undertake EE building retrofits without loans and the reluctance of local commercial banks to provide loans for EE renovation.

Component 4 grants from the GCF will be offered as a temporary targeted incentive. They will be targeted and will address the needs of the most vulnerable households. The financial analysis shows that, for those earning less than the median household income of US$400 per month, building retrofits are not affordable. For middle- and higher-income households, grants are not needed from an affordability point of view, and will only be used at a low level to overcome early-mover barriers. The grants will support poor and vulnerable households to secure access to improved thermal comfort and cost / energy savings. Incentive grants for low-income households are also needed to unlock building-level investments, as these households might otherwise block building-level investment decisions in multi-apartment buildings.

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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Component 1: Establishment of building sector Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV): Robust MRV for the building sector established

Component 2: Policy de-risking: National, sub-national and local authorities adopt and implement an enabling policy framework for EE retrofits

Component 3: Financial de-risking: Access to affordable capital for EE retrofits provided

Component 4: Financial incentives: Affordability of EE retrofits for the most vulnerable households ensured through targeted financial incentives to building / apartment owners (directly or via private-sector ESCOs)

Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change

Climate-induced pressures are negatively impacting impacting the energy sector in Benin. As average temperatures rise, electricity demand is increasing - with more intensive and longer use of air conditioning, ventilation and refrigeration needed during the year. Coupled with inefficient household and commercial equipment (fridges, TV, AC, fans) and non-efficient lighting of buildings, there are critical imbalances in the energy sector. 

With a view to improving the energy supply system, the quantity and the quality of energy sources and enhance the efficiency of energy supply and demand, this project, Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change, will work with the Government of Benin to enhance the human, institutional and regulatory capacity for a better planning and management of the energy resources; to increase the production, transport and distribution of the different forms of energy; and to improve poor rural access to energy. The main objective of the project is to reduce the impacts of climate change and variability on Benin’s energy sector

 

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (2.4073791427729 10.170619887336)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
8,000,000 USD (GEF Project Grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
31,570,000 USD
Project Details: 
The project will contribute in overcoming the political, institutional, financial barriers and those relating to individual capacities and to knowledge impeding to prevent and reduce the impacts in vulnerable communities of climate-related risks on the energy sector of Benin. This will involve the development of a strategy for strengthening resilience of the key energy sources, the integration of climate risks in the planning and budgeting processes of the energy sector and the promotion of behavioural change on the part of both consumers and producers of energy.
 
Both resilient energy use and the development of alternative energy sources (portfolio approach) will be necessary to reduce vulnerability. Given the importance of biomass in the context of Benin’s current energy supply, these measures will also need to be backed up by the practice of sustainable land management options especially in areas that are more vulnerable and the promotion of income-generating activities, alternatives to non-sustainable forest and land uses practices in riparian communities of wood energy supplying landscapes, and the adoption and implementation by Benin, of institutional, political and regulatory measures aiming at removing any obstacles to such adoption of adaptation measures.
 
The project will, therefore, support the achievement of the following key results: (a) Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools (Outcome 1), (b) introducing sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of wood energy supplying areas (Outcome 2), and (c) promoting the transfer of efficient technologies of production and use of wood energy and alternative forms of energy (Outcome 3).
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The project will support the achievement of the following key results: Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools, introducing sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of wood energy supplying areas, and promoting the transfer of efficient technologies of production and use of wood energy and alternative forms of energy.

Component 1 : Mainstreaming climate change into energy policies and management and planning strategies and tools
Outcome 1: Key energy policies, strategies and management and planning tools for the energy sector have integrated climate risks and adaptation measures

Component 2: Sustainable land and forest management practices for strengthening the climate resilience of the zones supplying wood for energy
Outcome 2: The climate resilience of the most vulnerable wood supply zones (for energy) is strengthened in response to climate change and variability impacts

Component 3: Technology transfers to strengthen the resilience of livelihoods and living conditions of the vulnerable communities
Outcome 3: Livelihood options and living conditions of the most vulnerable communities are made more resilient to the impact of climate change in the energy sector

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Rene Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
Saliou Toure
Technical Specialist, RSCSA
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
LDCF
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

The project was officially launched on the 22nd November 2016, by the Minister Energy at Viga Hotel in Bohicon (Centre of Benin). 

Display Photo: 
About (Summary): 
With a view to improving the energy supply system, the quantity and the quality of energy sources, and enhancing the efficiency of energy supply and demand, the Strengthening the Resilience of the Energy Sector in Benin to the Impacts of Climate Change project will work with the Government of Benin to enhance the human, institutional and regulatory capacity for better planning and management of energy resources; to increase the production, transport and distribution of the different forms of energy; and to improve poor rural access to energy. The main objective of the project is to reduce the impacts of climate change and variability on Benin’s energy sector The project was officially launched on the 22nd November 2016, by the Ministry of Energy at Viga Hotel in Bohicon (Centre of Benin).
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1: Key energy policies, strategies and management and planning tools for the energy sector have integrated climate risks and adaptation measures.

Outcome 2: The climate resilience of the most vulnerable wood supply zones (for energy) is strengthened in response to climate change and variability impacts.

Outcome 3: Livelihood options and living conditions of the most vulnerable communities are made more resilient to the impact of climate change in the energy sector.

Project Dates: 
2016 to 2021


Scaling-up of Glacial Lake Outburst Flood (GLOF) risk reduction in Northern Pakistan

Rising temperatures have melted glaciers, creating glacial lakes in Northern Pakistan. These carry the risk of outburst flooding events, threatening over 7 million people. Early warning systems, engineering structures and disaster management policies will reduce risk, protecting local communities and providing early warning of devastating flood events.

The melting of the Hindu Kush, Karakoram, and Himalayan glaciers in Northern Pakistan due to rising temperatures have created 3,044 glacial lakes in the federally-administered territory of Gilgit-Baltistan (GB) and the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP). It is estimated that 33 of these glacial lakes are hazardous and likely to result in glacial lake outburst floods. Such flooding releases millions of cubic metres of water and debris in just a few hours, resulting in the loss of lives, destruction of property and infrastructure, and severe damage to livelihoods in some of the most remote areas of Pakistan.

In response to these risks, the 
"Scaling-up of Glacial Lake Outburst Flood (GLOF) risk reduction in Northern Pakistan" project will build 250 engineering structures including damns, ponds, spill ways, tree plantation and drainage to reduce risk. At the same time, the development of disaster management policies and the introduction of weather monitoring stations, flood gauges, hydrological modelling and early warning systems will increase the ability to respond rapidly to flood scenarios.

 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (67.85156248472 28.77728904076)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
29 million people
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$37 million (GCF financing according to GCF website)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$500,000 (Government of Gilgit - Baltistan according to GCF website)
Project Details: 

The melting of the Hindu Kush, Karakoram, and Himalayan glaciers in Northern Pakistan due to rising temperatures has created 3,044 glacial lakes in the federally-administered territory of Gilgit-Baltistan (GB) and the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP). It is estimated that 33 of these glacial lakes are hazardous and likely to result in glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Such outbursts have occurred in the past and when they do, millions of cubic metres of water and debris is released in a few hours, resulting in the loss of lives, destruction of property and infrastructure, and severe damage to livelihoods in some of the most remote areas of Pakistan. Currently 7,101,000 people remain at risk in GB and KP. Most recently, in July 2015, over 280,000 people in GB and KP were affected, a combination of heavy rains and GLOFs.

At present, the country faces a critical gap in technical and technological capacity to monitor the status of glaciers through hydrological monitoring and forecasting. Current early warning systems (EWS) do not have the capacity to support the management of risks posed by rising water levels in the lakes, including failure to issue early warnings to communities. The design and implementation of medium- and long-term disaster management policies and risk reduction and preparedness plans are also not fully geared to deal with the specifics of GLOF threats. 

The Government of Pakistan has recognized the threat from GLOFs in its National Climate Change Policy and in its National Determined Contribution to monitor changes in glacier volumes and related GLOFs. The Government of Pakistan is seeking GCF resources to upscale ongoing initiatives on early warning systems and small, locally-sourced infrastructure to protect communities from GLOF risks. The interventions proposed for scale up by this project will be based on activities implemented in two districts on a trial basis that have proven to be impactful. In particular, engineering structures (i.e. gabion walls) have been constructed; automatic weather stations, rain gauge and discharge equipment were installed to support rural communities to avoid human and material losses from GLOF events. The proposed GCF project will expand coverage to twelve districts in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Gilgit-Baltistan provinces. The proposed project will strengthen the technical capacity of sub-national decision makers to integrate climate change and disaster risk management into medium- and long-term development planning processes.

 

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1: Strengthened sub-national institutional capacities to plan and implement climate change -resilient development pathways

This output responds to the need for systematic integration of GLOF risk management into the processes, policies and plans of institutions that have a stake in avoiding human and material losses from GLOF events in vulnerable areas in the Departments of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and Gilgit-Baltistan (GB). GCF resources will be used to strengthen the capabilities of local level institutions (Disaster Risk Management, Agriculture, Livestock and Water sector in the Departments of GB and KP and federal level institutions (Ministry of Kashmir Affairs, Ministry of Environment and National Disaster Management Authority) to incorporate climate change adaptation considerations into development plans in GB and KP. The incorporation of climate change adaptation measures into the planning instruments will also be based on progress made at the national level under NCCP and by other regions in including climate change measures in sectoral, territorial, and environmental planning instruments. More specifically, the project will make use of the lessons learned from the recently completed UNDP/Adaptation Fund supported project: “Reducing Risks and Vulnerabilities from Glacier Lake Outburst Floods in Northern Pakistan”. In addition, GCF resources will be used to promote the inclusion of information generated from early warning systems and hydrological modeling (Output 2) to generate flood scenarios that then can better inform local development plans and, by extension, budgeting.

Output 2: Community-based EWS and long-term measures are up-scaled to increase communities’ adaptive capacity

A key result that GCF resources will finance focuses on the scaling up of interventions that have been tested with other financing to increase adaptive capacity of communities in target valleys. GCF resources will expand the climate information surveillance and discharge measuring network in the region. GCF resources will be used to procure and install 50 automatic weather stations (AWS) and 408 river discharge gauges/sensors. These monitoring instruments will provide the requisite data to conduct hydrological modeling to generate flood risk scenarios that will feed into a flood early warning system to enable the dissemination of flashflood warning signals on a 24-hour basis generated by PMD through cellphones. AWS and river discharge sensors will provide information to capacitate village hazard watch groups that will be part of a local-level early warning system. Small-scale hard adaptation structures will be constructed (gabion walls, spillways, check dams) to protect human lives and household’s assets in combination with bioengineering interventions to stabilize slopes slides, reducing the risk of debris slides. In Pakistan EIAs are not required for smaller infrastructure projects. The protective capability of these structures will be amplified by additional resources channeled to the communities ex ante and following a GLOF event through the scale up of already established, revolving community-based disaster risk management fund. In addition, ecosystem-based adaptation interventions will be promoted in order to increase resilience against GLOFs events while supporting livelihoods.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project-level monitoring and evaluation will be undertaken in compliance with the UNDP POPP and the UNDP Evaluation Policy. UNDP will perform monitoring and reporting throughout the Reporting Period in accordance with the AMA. UNDP has country presence and capacity to perform such functions. In the event of any additional post-implementation obligations over and above the AMA, UNDP will discuss and agree these with the GCF Secretariat in the final year of the implementation period.

The primary responsibility for day-to-day project monitoring and implementation rests with the Project Manager. The Project Manager will develop annual work plans to ensure the efficient implementation of the project. The Project Manager will inform the Project Board and the UNDP Country Office of any delays or difficulties during implementation, including the implementation of the M&E plan, so that the appropriate support and corrective measures can be adopted. The Project Manager will also ensure that all project staff maintain a high level of transparency, responsibility and accountability in monitoring and reporting project results.  

The UNDP Country Office will support the Project Manager as needed, including through annual supervision missions. The UNDP Country Office is responsible for complying with UNDP project-level M&E requirements as outlined in the UNDP POPP. Additional M&E and implementation quality assurance and troubleshooting support will be provided by the UNDP Regional Technical Advisor as needed. The project target groups and stakeholders including the NDA Focal Point will be involved as much as possible in project-level M&E. 

A project inception workshop will be held after the UNDP project document has been signed by all relevant parties to: a) re-orient project stakeholders to the project strategy and discuss any changes in the overall context that influence project implementation; b) discuss the roles and responsibilities of the project team, including reporting and communication lines and conflict resolution mechanisms; c) review the results framework and discuss reporting, monitoring and evaluation roles and responsibilities and finalize the M&E plan; d) review financial reporting procedures and mandatory requirements, and agree on the arrangements for the annual audit; e) plan and schedule Project Board meetings and finalize the first year annual work plan. The Project Manager will prepare the inception report no later than one month after the inception workshop. The final inception report will be cleared by the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP Regional Technical Adviser, and will be approved by the Project Board.   

 

The Project Manager, the UNDP Country Office, and the UNDP Regional Technical Advisor will provide objective input to the annual Project Implementation Report (PIR) for each year of project implementation.  The Project Manager will ensure that the indicators included in the project results framework are monitored annually well in advance of the PIR submission deadline and will objectively report progress in the Development Objective tab of the PIR.  The annual PIR will be shared with the project board and other stakeholders.  The UNDP Country Office will coordinate the input of the NDA Focal Point and other stakeholders to the PIR.  The quality rating of the previous year’s PIR will be used to inform the preparation of the next PIR.  The final project PIR along with the terminal evaluation report and corresponding management response will serve as the final project report package.   

An independent mid-term review process will be undertaken and the findings and responses outlined in the management response will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s duration. The terms of reference, the review process and the final MTR report will follow the standard templates and guidance available on the UNDP Evaluation Resource Center. The final MTR report will be cleared by the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP Regional Technical Adviser, and will be approved by the Project Board. The final MTR report will be available in English. 

 

An independent terminal evaluation (TE) will take place no later than three months prior to operational closure of the project.  The terms of reference, the review process and the final TE report will follow the standard templates and guidance available on the UNDP Evaluation Resource Center. The final TE report will be cleared by the UNDP Country Office and the UNDP Regional Technical Adviser, and will be approved by the Project Board. The TE report will be available in English. 

The UNDP Country Office will include the planned project terminal evaluation in the UNDP Country Office evaluation plan, and will upload the final terminal evaluation report in English and the management response to the public UNDP Evaluation Resource Centre (ERC) (http://erc.undp.org).  Once uploaded to the ERC, the UNDP Independent Evaluation Office will undertake a quality assessment and validate the findings and ratings in the TE report, and rate the quality of the TE report.  

The UNDP Country Office will retain all M&E records for this project for up to seven years after project financial closure in order to support ex-post evaluations.

A detailed M&E budget, monitoring plan and evaluation plan will be included in the UNDP project document.  UNDP will perform monitoring and reporting throughout the reporting period in accordance with the AMA and Funded Activity Agreement (FAA).  UNDP has country presence and capacity to perform such functions.  In the event of any additional post-implementation obligations over and above the AMA, UNDP will discuss and agree these with the GCF Secretariat in the final year of the project and will prepare a post-implementation monitoring plan and budget for approval by the GCF Board as necessary.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Reis Lopez Rello
Regional Technical Advisor in Climate Change Adaptation
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


News and Updates: 


Information in French / Informations en français: 


Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1: Strengthened sub-national institutional capacities to plan and implement climate change-resilient development pathways

Output 2: Community-based EWS and long-term measures are up-scaled to increase communities’ adaptive capacity

Project Dates: 
2017 to 2021
Civil Society Engagement: 


Improving resilience of vulnerable coastal communities to climate change in Vietnam

The "Improving resilience of vulnerable coastal communities to climate change in Vietnam" project seeks to scale up interventions that have already been tested to increase the resilience of vulnerable coastal communities. Building on ongoing social protection programmes related to housing for the poor and marginalized, the project will incorporate storm and flood resilient design features in new houses benefiting 20,000 poor and highly disaster-exposed people. As part of an integrated response to managing flood risks, 4,000 hectares of mangroves will be rehabilitated and/or planted to function not only as storm surge buffers, but also to provide ecosystem resources that can support coastal livelihoods. Moreover, to support and sustain both the impact of this project as well as future requisite government policy adjustments that strengthen the resilience of coastal and other communities, resources will be used to systematize climate and economic risk assessments for private and public sector application in all 28 coastal provinces of Viet Nam.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (107.66601559196 16.405787866187)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
30 million coastal residents will benefit from improved planning integrating climate risk information, 20,000 people will benefit from climate-resilient housing, and 3,8 million people in the target coastal provinces will benefit from the protection offered by healthy and robust mangrove regeneration. An estimated 1.9 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions will be avoided.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$29.5 million (GCF grant according to GCF website)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$11 million (US$8 million from the Ministry of Construction, US$1.4 million from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and US$1.6 million from UNDP according to GCF website)
Project Details: 

Poor communities living in coastal regions of Viet Nam are adversely impacted by frequent flooding. Each year approximately 60,000 houses are destroyed or damaged by floods and storms in coastal provinces. This is likely to worsen given climate change scenarios for Viet Nam. Resultant economic impacts make it increasingly difficult for vulnerable families to escape the cycle of poverty. The proposed GCF project seeks to scale up interventions that are already tested to increase the resilience of vulnerable coastal communities. Building on ongoing social protection programmes related to housing for the poor and marginalized, the project will incorporate storm and flood resilient design features in new houses benefiting 20,000 poor and highly disaster-exposed people. As part of an integrated response to managing flood risks, 4,000 hectares of mangroves will be rehabilitated and/or planted to function not only as storm surge buffers, but also to provide ecosystem resources that can support coastal livelihoods. Moreover, to support and sustain both the impact of this project as well as future requisite government policy adjustments that strengthen the resilience of coastal and other communities, resources will be used to systematize climate and economic risk assessments for private and public sector application in all 28 coastal provinces of Viet Nam.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1:  Storm and flood resilient design features added to 4,000 new houses on safe sites, benefiting 20,000  poor and highly disaster-exposed people in 100 communes

  • In the flood and typhoon prone areas of coastal of Viet Nam. This project will provide for the additional cost of safety features and improved monitoring (approximately US$2,000/house), to 4,000 houses constructed under the broader government housing programming benefitting the poor. Specifically these include (a) a concrete roof with strengthened bracings and fittings (US$900), (b) reinforced windows, doors and sealing (US$400) (c) improvements to drainage, siting and raising plinths (US$400) and (d) improved monitoring to ensure that the finished product is one that reflects all of the resilience features of the house design (US$300). This will be fully coordinated with the government housing programme, and grant support to beneficiaries will follow the government’s monitoring and disbursement schedule.
  • Risk assessments will be conducted through the established CBDRM mechanism, to ensure that house siting is on a safe location. Links will be made to existing information such as the storm surge maps generated by the Disaster Management Center.
  • The 100 target communes selected for this work will serve as learning hubs for broader dissemination in adjacent communes and provinces. Selection of communes and households to receive support will follow existing government criteria. Criteria and prioritization criteria are further detailed in Annex II: Feasibility Study.
  • Training on engineering innovations for flood and storm resistant housing technologies, and to deliver hands-on advice and guidance to local authorities and affected households on safe and affordable house designs and construction.

Output 2: Regeneration of 4,000 hectares of coastal mangrove storm surge buffer zones using successful evidence-based approaches

  • This project will support regeneration of approximately 4,000 hectares of mangroves, in coastal areas vulnerable to climate change impacts. This project will enable scale up of good practices from various pilots and integrate field proven best practices. Supplementary funds will allow for the application of improved planting and maintenance technologies outlined above, and implement the measures to ensure that livelihoods are maintained (such as relocating communal shrimp ponds to where the pressures on the mangrove stands will be minimized and the shrimp production can be well maintained).
  • Specific sites within the province for project intervention will be identified/assessed through various criteria, namely (a) exposure to climate change induced events (i.e. typhoons, storm surges, sea level rise, coastal flooding), (b) potential for mangrove restoration, and (c) complementarity with ongoing government or partner support to maximize the impact of combined resources. Regeneration and rehabilitation efforts will be implemented in phases. While the techniques to be used are based on best practices of previous mangrove rehabilitation efforts, a phased approach will allow time for further monitoring and assessment of techniques, as well as review of risk mitigation measures. Adjustments will be made as needed to maximize the survival rate.
  • Target communes will set up a community committee incorporating both local government and a cross-section of residents to complete a CBDRM risk assessment and planning process. Additional sessions on coastal mapping, mangrove regeneration and livelihoods maintenance will be added. The community CBDRM plans will therefore include location specific actions to support implementation and maintenance of the mangroves. The project will then roll out mangrove regeneration actions to enable application of improved techniques to increase survival rates. This will be community driven process as part of the commune planning and implementation using the CBDRM process for community mobilization and engagement.

Output 3: Increased access to enhanced climate, loss and damage data for  private and public sector application in all 28 coastal provinces of Viet Nam

  • MARD with assistance of UNDP has worked to establish the first natural disaster loss and damage database, strengthening early warning system design and meteorological service capacity. MONRE with assistance of UNDP has strengthened climate change data and analysis and has completed the Special Report on Extreme Events (SREX) submitted to the IPCC in 2014.  The government has recently developed Viet Nam’s first coastal storm surge maps to improve coastal inundation mapping.
  • MARD and MONRE will make improved information more accessible to government decision makers especially at the sub-national level, on-going national programs and the private sector. This will be done by developing integrated risk maps at the sub-national level using the established methodology that Viet Nam has already been applied to produce maps in 20 out of 63 provinces. Viet Nam will be able to produce risk mapping of the entire coastal area, combing local level knowledge with the best scientific data. Data quality will also be improved by including super-storm and storm surge data based on 2014-2015 models and more accurate sea level rise projections included in the fifth IPCC assessment report. Additional analysis of salt water intrusion zones using new satellite based technology will also be included. Although this data has been developed, or is near finalization, it is not currently being systematically applied by the government at any level.  This would be a transformative change in Viet Nam’s ability to analyze and compare climate change risks in coastal areas.
Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Ms
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Display Photo: 
About (Summary): 
Poor communities living in coastal regions of Viet Nam are adversely impacted by frequent flooding. Each year approximately 60,000 houses are destroyed or damaged by floods and storms in coastal provinces. This is likely to worsen given climate change scenarios for Viet Nam. Resultant economic impacts make it increasingly difficult for vulnerable families to escape the cycle of poverty. The proposed GCF project seeks to scale up interventions that are already tested to increase the resilience of vulnerable coastal communities. Building on ongoing social protection programmes related to housing for the poor and marginalized, the project will incorporate storm and flood resilient design features in new houses benefiting 20,000 poor and highly disaster-exposed people. As part of an integrated response to managing flood risks, 4,000 hectares of mangroves will be rehabilitated and/or planted to function not only as storm surge buffers, but also to provide ecosystem resources that can support coastal livelihoods. Moreover, to support and sustain both the impact of this project as well as future requisite government policy adjustments that strengthen the resilience of coastal and other communities, resources will be used to systematize climate and economic risk assessments for private and public sector application in all 28 coastal provinces of Viet Nam.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output1: Storm and flood resilient design features added to 4,000 new houses on safe sites, benefiting 20,000  poor and highly disaster-exposed people in 100 communes

Output 2: Regeneration of 4,000 hectares of costal mangrove storm surge buffer zones 

Output 3: Increased access to enhanced climate, loss and damage data for  private and public sector application in all 28 coastal provinces of Viet Nam 

Strengthening the Resilience of Smallholder Farmers in the Dry Zone to Climate Variability and Extreme Events

This "Strengthening the Resilience of Smallholder Farmers in the Dry Zone to Climate Variability and Extreme Events" project will address water quality and quantity issues that impact people who are dependent upon village irrigation systems in the Dry Zones of Sri Lanka.

With mounting concerns about the impact of climate change on the agriculture sector, the Government of Sri Lanka, under the leadership of the newly elected President, is paying the highest attention to this mounting and worsening crisis in the Dry Zone. Concerns are especially elevated due to the prevailing incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease, for which poor-quality water is cited as a contributing factor, and is increasing at an alarming rate in the Dry Zone. Recent experiences show that current climate forecasting and early warning systems have to be improved, in addition to structural and institutional solutions, to comprehensively address the impacts of the climate change on the agriculture sector.

By addressing these concerns, the Government of Sri Lanka will help the large proportion of Sri Lankan people who are dependent upon livelihoods connected to agriculture and reverse the loss of production from climate-related hazards to improve food security and livelihood opportunities.

 

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (80.661621054605 7.586113268882)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
2 million, especially smallholder farmers in the Dry Zones in Sri Lanka
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$38.1 million (GCF grant according to GCF website)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$ 14 million (co-financing from the Government of Sri Lanka according to GCF website)
Project Details: 

Sri Lanka’s recent economic gains, following the end of a debilitating 30 year war and the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, are being threatened due to its increasing vulnerability to climate change which is characterized by increasing temperatures and unpredictability of rainfall. Almost 80% of poor Sri Lankans live in the rural areas and depend on agriculture for food and income. IPCC’s fifth assessment report predicts that South Asia, including Sri Lanka, is vulnerable to drought, flood, food shortages and heat-related mortality. The country has been experiencing severe shifts in its seasonal rainfall patterns accompanied by increased flood and drought in the last decade directly impacting rural food security and incomes.

While categorized as a middle-income country, Sri Lanka masks a complicated situation with deep regional disparities in wealth and wellbeing. About 5.2 million people — equivalent to a quarter of the population — were estimated to be undernourished in 2014. This persistence of rural poverty, indebtedness and vulnerability, high youth unemployment at 19%, low participation of women in the labour force and large-scale migration in search of employment all indicate a high level of unevenness in growth and opportunity across the provinces and districts.  Poverty and social exclusion are most prevalent in under-developed rural districts where agriculture is the major livelihood. The conflict-affected districts in the Northern and Eastern Provinces and peripheral districts are most deprived where many years of exclusion from the benefits of a steady economic growth and development resulted in greater social vulnerabilities.

Dry Zone Context – agricultural livelihoods, poverty, and conflict

The Dry Zone is one of three climatic zones (dry, intermediate and wet) that divide Sri Lanka on the basis of variations in rainfall. It receives less rainfall than average and has pronounced dry periods. The Dry Zone covers 70% of the island’s land area and is the country’s agricultural heartland and the main area where the staple rice is grown. Small-scale farmers with land holdings of less than 2 hectares dominate agriculture in this region.  Many other forms of employment in the Dry Zone are also related to agriculture – e.g. agricultural marketing, transport, and financial services. About two-third of the cultivated area in the country is rain fed or irrigated by numerous semi-rainfed minor reservoirs and diversions, collectively referred to as village irrigation schemes. A number of studies confirm that smallholder farmers cultivating under village irrigation systems are poorer and more vulnerable than their Dry Zone counterparts who have access to major irrigation. Such farmers are much more vulnerable to impacts of climate change than farmers cultivating under larger irrigation systems. As productivity and crop yields decline with low water availability and unseasonal rains resulting from climate variability and extreme events, farmers are dragged deeper into poverty and face food deficits, which have to be met by buying food for consumption, increasing the level of indebtedness and further eroding their capacity to cope with climate risks.

While the impacts of the conflict were experienced throughout the country (eg. suicide bombing and attacks on public places, economic downturn, social issues with war casualties), several districts in the Dry Zone were directly affected by the fighting and resultant large-scale displacement. The five districts of the Northern Province, three districts in the Eastern Province and peripheral districts such as Puttalam, Anuradhapura, Moneragala and Polonnaruwa were directly impacted by the war. This is about 60% of the country’s land area and around two thirds of the coastline of the country. The end of the war in 2009 has allowed many of these districts to re-enter the economic mainstream. However, serious challenges remain in completing resettlement and meaningful resumption of economic activities in this region, complicated by frequent and recurrent climate-induced disasters and extreme weather events in the last five years. Recurrent floods and droughts in the last 5-6 years have battered all the districts struggling to overcome the direct impacts of conflict with severe impacts on food security, income, and water for drinking and sanitation of displaced/resettled communities as well as those living in remote border districts.

A paradigm shift in addressing adaptation needs among farmers in the Dry Zone lies in developing an integrated, holistic approach to water security that considers the entire ‘cascade’ or sub-basin system and the inter-connectedness of the village irrigation systems, agricultural practices, and water supply and management techniques for multiple uses, including drinking water. Village irrigation systems (VIS) provide communities with a means of coping with seasonal variability; and, improving their functionality is seen as a means of adaptation to climate change. Increased resilience to floods and droughts require cost-effective design changes and enhancements to the system to reduce flood damages and improve dry-season storage. Efficient, planned, climate-risk informed water management at field and sub-basin level should complement improved availability and access to water. This includes resilient and ecologically sustainable agricultural practices, which substantially deviate from current field practices. Introduction of improved, short duration rice and other crops, simple micro irrigation techniques, semi-mechanisation for water efficiency etc. can ensure longer water storage and availability for multiple uses. Many villages secure their drinking water from wells that are immediately downstream of the village reservoir. Increased water capture and storage will improve both year round access to drinking water and improved agricultural practices, including the reduction of agro-chemical use, will in the long-term improve the quality of drinking water. Harvesting rainwater at household-level can also improve access to quality drinking water as rainwater is considerably safer and of better quality than ground water in the Dry Zone. In addition, early warning information, based on meteorological and seasonal forecasts, is a key part of the water management system. It enables preparation and mitigating measures to be enacted ahead of climate-related disasters and variability ensuring the optimal management of water resources.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Output 1:Upgrading and enhancing resilience of village irrigation systems and scaling up climate-resilient farming practices in three river basins of the Dry Zone

  • Improve technical capacity and knowledge management targeting ASCs, local field officials and community organisations for climate-risk informed water management and climate-smart agriculture

    This activity will support the development of cascade level water management plans and guidelines that incorporate climate risks and impacts in a participatory, multi-stakeholder approach. It will include training for FOs and other CBOs (women’s groups) to implement and maintain the project investments in light of a changing climate. The activity will improve collaboration for planning and equitable water sharing between users in a cascade. ASCs in the river basin will be developed as knowledge and communication hubs including supporting cross-district, cross ethnic experience sharing through exchange field visits and field training programmes. It will address the barriers of limited technical capacity, institutional coordination, and knowledge for integrated approach to climate-risk informed water and agriculture management.

  • Activity 1.2 Improve resilience of and upgrade village irrigation systems in the identified cascades including restoration of upstream watersheds

    GCF resources and government co-financing will be used to support the design and upgrades of VIS, incorporating elements to enhance the resilience of these systems to climate change risks and impacts. About 325 village irrigation systems, including the upstream catchments, will be upgraded based on the cascade level water development plans. The interventions to upgrade the irrigation systems include: i. reforesting the watershed and re-introducing the vegetative interceptor to trap contaminants: ii. Restoring the reservoir bund (dam), spill, sluice and canals supplying the fields, and iii. Desilting the reservoir bed. These upgrades will incorporate climate risks and combine traditional and new design elements and practices including partial de-silting to deepen reservoirs close to the bund and retain more water during dry seasons, intensified reforesting of the catchment with multi-purpose trees, creating ponds and diversions for run-off capture in the catchment, upstream soil conservation practices like hedgerows, contour drains to prevent erosion, and creating small ponds in home gardens to capture intense rainfall.

  • Activity 1.3 Develop and disseminate climate resilient agricultural practices with targeted enterprise development for women

    The activity will support government extension services to develop and widely disseminate demand-driven, tested, climate change risk informed agriculture support packages which includes drought/flood resilient crops (seeds), organic inputs, soil and water management technologies and market oriented agro-processing technologies. Together with the seasonal climate forecasts (Activity 3.2) and improved marketing options for the recommended crops (supported by market mapping undertaken through this activity; crop recommendations co-financed by Department of Agrarian Development and Department of Agriculture), the climate resilient agriculture package will provide more food, income and improve ability of farmers to cope with seasonal variability and improve rational use of water. Based on the past experiences from other similar initiatives (e.g. IUCN/HSBC project and SAPSRI Project—refer to Annex II, Feasibility Report, Section 5.3), recommended practices include using short-term and climate resilient traditional rice varieties; landscaping/vegetative barriers for erosion control; crop diversification and composting in home gardens; use of organic fertilizers; crop diversification during the minor season; rational use of chemical inputs based on soil condition; agronomic and crop establishment techniques such as dry sowing in paddy fields in between seasons; and micro irrigation, with due regard to the agro-ecological regions. Resilient agriculture practices recognize the need to address climate-related factors (drought and flood resistant crops, shorter duration field crops) along with non-climate drivers for safe and chemical-free agriculture that contributes to long-term improvement of water quality.

Output 2: Enhancing climate-resilient, decentralized water management solutions to provide safe year-round drinking water to drought vulnerable communities

  • Activity 2.1 Improve capacity of water-supply support staff at district/divisions, selected partner organisations (NGOs) and CBOs to implement and maintain community-based climate change risk informed drinking water related interventions

    Village irrigation reservoirs are a key source of drinking water in the Dry Zone. As such, the expected risks on drinking water on both the supply and demand side as climate change needs should be incorporated into the cascade water management plans in Output 1. The activity focuses on planning and capacity building to address the barriers of technical capacity and institutional coordination related to provision of safe drinking water to the Dry Zone communities. The capacities of local officials and women-led CBOs will be strengthened for climate-risk management related to drinking water sources, supply systems, and quality monitoring and management. The activity will support training and mobilization to ensure the drinking water needs in light of a changing climate are incorporated into cascade development plans implemented through cascade-level water committees and water source protection committees. It will also build capacities for climate-risk informed planning for water source protection and quality monitoring coordinating with NWSDB. These will inform the selection of climate-risk informed treatment methods appropriate for the water sources.

  • Activity 2.2 Implement sustainable, climate-resilient drinking water solutions through CBOs and government agencies

    GCF resources and government co-financing will be invested to establish climate-resilient, community water systems (with simple treatment) for water extracted from irrigation systems and domestic rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems to supplement drinking water during prolonged dry periods. In addition, advanced purification and filtrations systems will be established to supplement long-term measures such as ecological agronomic practices (Output 1) that impact drinking water quality. This activity addresses the technical and financial barriers related to investments in rural water supply schemes, improved water treatment and purification schemes and domestic rainwater harvesting units. The design and operation of these systems will incorporate climate risks and information (including advisories and forecasts generated under Output 3) and will be fully integrated into the cascade water management planning (Output 1).

Output 3: Strengthening climate and hydrological observing and forecasting systems to enhance water management and adaptive capacity of smallholder farmers to droughts and floods

  • Activity 3.1 Establish effective monitoring systems for drought, floods and water management

    This activity expands the meteorological and hydrological observational network coverage by installing, operating and maintaining monitoring equipment in key catchments and VIS systems. This will enable DAD, ID and FOs to better understand and monitor current conditions within the cascade systems, as well as streamflow, which may cause flooding of agricultural areas further downstream. Agrometeorological data will be used to estimate a suite of products including evapotranspiration and soil moisture, which will help detect the onset of agricultural droughts. Along with 10 automatic rainfall gauges the rainfall data will be used to support the development of satellite-based estimates in activity 3.2. Additionally these data can help refine MOS-based forecasts (see 3.2), once a suitably long time-series (approximately 3-5 years) becomes available. Automated water level sensors (50) will be used by DAD and ID to monitor water levels at critical points in the three river basins, which along with 8 streamflow gauges, will allow early detection of rising flood waters. Water levels and rainfall will be monitored in VIS systems by FOs and farmers using 330 manual staff (water-level) and rainfall gauges.

  • Activity 3.2 Co-develop and disseminate weather- and climate-based advisories for agricultural and water management through ASCs and FOs to farmers and village water managers

    This activity address institutional capacity and financial barriers related to provision of early warnings and forecasting. It supports the eestablishment of protocols and SOPs for generating, sharing and using weather data and information between national agencies (DoM, DAD, ID and DMC) and ASCs/FOs. It will involve the sensitization of communities and FOs to the availability of weather and climate information, as well as the function of any local equipment, which will be used to generate data used in the advisories. Through this activity a sense of ownership will be cultivated to avoid vandalism of equipment etc. The sense of ownership will be further promoted through co-development of information requirements for agriculture and water management. A training of trainers to use and adapt weather/climate based advisories will be undertaken to enable FOs and lead farmers to understand the historical context of climate information as a basis for understanding the implication of and using weather and seasonal forecasts.

  • Activity 3.3 Develop climate-risk management response measures based on advisories and forecasts for agriculture, water management and flooding in cascade systems

    This activity will develop and plan appropriate climate risk management responses to the advisories developed through activity 3.2, including the additional impacts expected through climate change. This will involve inundation area mapping of areas in the three river basins prone to flooding in order to set the baseline flooding scenarios expected without climate change.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Srilata Kammila
Ms
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Display Photo: 
About (Summary): 
This project will address water quality and quantity issues that impact people who are dependent upon village irrigation systems in the Dry Zones of Sri Lanka. With mounting concerns about the impact of climate change on the agriculture sector, the Government of Sri Lanka, under the leadership of the newly elected President, is paying the highest attention to this mounting and worsening crisis in the Dry Zone. Concerns are especially elevated due to the prevailing incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease, for which poor-quality water is cited as a contributing factor, and is increasing at an alarming rate in the Dry Zone. Recent experiences show that current climate forecasting and early warning systems have to be improved, in addition to structural and institutional solutions, to comprehensively address the impacts of the climate change on the agriculture sector. By addressing these concerns, the Government of Sri Lanka will help the large proportion of Sri Lankan people who are dependent upon livelihoods connected to agriculture and reverse the loss of production from climate-related hazards to improve food security and livelihood opportunities.
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Output 1: Upgrading and enhancing resilience of village irrigation systems and scaling up climate-resilient farming practices in three river basins of the Dry Zone.

Output 2: Enhancing climate-resilient, decentralized water management solutions to provide safe year-round drinking water to drought vulnerable communities.

Output 3: Strengthening climate and hydrological observing and forecasting systems to enhance water management and adaptive capacity of smallholder farmers to droughts and floods.

Flood Hazard and Climate Risk Management to Secure Lives and Assets in Mali

The "Flood Hazard and Climate Risk Management to Secure Lives and Assets in Mali" project is expected to develop adaptation benefits that minimise the exposure of vulnerable populations to floods and flash floods risks and thereby minimise losses of assets that will accelerate with the expected impacts of climate change on the hydrological regime.

The project is seeking to develop long-term sustainable approaches by mainstreaming climate risk management into local development plans. The sustainable land and water management techniques and riverbank protections will help to maintain/restore biodiversity by strengthening the functionality of the ecosystems. Local government  recognises the significance of flood risk and the need to integrate flood risk assessment and its management into the planning process in order to deliver a policy to avoid and minimise potential future flood risk.

The project will take into account how resource degradation and natural disasters (flooding) affects men and women and vulnerable groups (children, young and old) differently. The dissemination and sharing of information will be developed and disseminated in order to ensure that women and girls - especially those who are poor or who were denied the right to education - can easily have access to the necessary information. Gender issues will be appropriately highlighted throughout the entire risks assessment and training material. In terms of policy planning, gender-specific information elements ought to be integrated into such materials, as gender sensitive analysis and planning is an important aspect of effective climate risk planning and response.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
In total, 51 local communities spread across seven communes in the districts of Bamako, Kayes and Mopti will directly benefit from the project.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$8.9 million (proposed GEF-LDCF grant)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$51.7 million
Project Details: 

As a result of climate change, Mali is increasingly experiencing floods. From 1980-2007, two significant floods were recorded that collectively impacted over 3 million people. In addition, the floods experienced in Bamako in August 2013, affected over 34,000 people out of which ~20,000 were displaced. These floods resulted in the death of 37 people and the loss of 280 homes in the capital city of Bamako.

In 2014, 98.5% of economic losses as a result of disasters are attributed to floods amounting to US$45 million per year. The areas most affected by floods over the last 30 years are located within the Niger Delta and include inter alia Bamako, Timbuktu, Gao, Mopti, Ségou, Kayes, Koulikoro and Sikasso.

Some of the floods experienced in Mali have reportedly damaged over 12,000 hectares of crops thereby negatively affecting the livelihoods poor rural people. Under the predicted conditions of climate change, an increasing number of climate-related hazards such as floods and heat waves is likely to occur. These hazards are predicted to increase in severity and frequency under future climatic conditions.

An increase in the severity and frequency of this hazard is likely to result in a larger number of flood-induced human deaths, people displaced, damages to houses and public infrastructure, and loss of crops.

The objective of the GEF-LDCF-financed project is to strengthen the capacity of national and local government authorities to effectively manage and reduce the negative impacts of floods on local communities and infrastructure in Mali. To achieve this objective, the project will support improved planning and decision-making within government authorities to respond to flood risks and hazards. This enhanced capacity of national and local government authorities to plan and implement locally-appropriate flood mitigation strategies will reduce the vulnerability of local communities to the negative effects of floods.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

1.1. Establish sound climate information systems and devices operating 24 hours a day for monitoring and forecasting flood hazards and providing reliable warnings using mobile phone platforms;

1.2. Develop early warning and quickresponse systems including distributing early warning information LDCF 3,500,000 9,500,000 TA

1.3. Undertake climate hazard analysis combining flood hazard mapping with socio-economic indicators (e.g. population maps, land value, assets and land use information) to derive associated risks;

1.4. Develop and role out education programme among school children to build a culture of safety and resilience from floods and other climate change related hazards.

2.1. Develop Flood Risk Reduction plans for Municipalities and villages (FRRP) that include local strategies, ,and concrete steps on how to reduce the risks from floods;

2.2. Design, harmonize and enhance existing building & settlement codes to address resilience to climate change induced flooding;

2.3. Develop financial strategies to ensure adequate financial capacity and rapid release of funds, thus enabling emergency response, reconstruction of public assets and infrastructure and targeted financial assistance.

2.4. Targeted training of national and local authorities responsible for climate risk management in advanced methods of forward looking climate risk management planning and flood prevention measures;

3.1. Climate risk reduction measures implemented such as bank terracing, vegetative buffers, etc. implemented to increase the infiltration and reduce erosion

3.2. Structural measures, such as embankments, dykes, levees and floodwalls, etc., financed to protect human health and safety, and valuable goods and property

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Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1- Strengthened technical capacity of municipal and village authorities to improve flood early warning systems and dissemination of climate-related risk information. 

Outcome 2 - Effective flood risk management mainstreamed into the relevant development planning policies and budgetary processes to increase the resilience of local communities.

Outcome 3 - Climate-resilient flood risk management and reduction techniques transferred to local communities within the targeted communes to decrease their vulnerability.