Private Sector Partners

Taxonomy Term List

Promoting Innovative Finance and Community Based Adaptation in Communes Surrounding Community Natural Reserves in Senegal

The "Promoting Innovative Finance and Community Based Adaptation in Communes Surrounding Community Natural Reserves (Ferlo, Niokolo Koba, Bas Delta Senegal, Delta du Saloum) in Senegal" project will work to create financial incentives to cover the incremental costs of climate change adaptation and support capacity building for vulnerable households and community groups to build holistic responses to climate change.

With US$5.4 million in proposed funding from the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund, the initiative will assist Senegal to pursue a "transformational" pathway towards resilience. In the long term it will empower local institutions to provide adaptation services to vulnerable communities.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The overall project will generate socio-economic benefits at the local level by involving communities in the 203 villages (at least 50,000 households)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$5.4 million proposed GEF-LDCF funding
Co-Financing Total: 
US$16.9 million (US$1.4 million Ministry of Environment and Finance proposed co-financing, US$6.5 million proposed UNDP grant)
Project Details: 

The LDCF-funded initiative will assist Senegal to pursue a "transformational" pathway towards resilience. Under this approach, in the long term, local institutions will be able to provide adaptation services to vulnerable communities.

To achieve the project goals, changes in practices are needed, specifically to establish attractive funding mechanisms , linked to existing local financing systems, to cover the incremental costs of climate change adaptation, and to provide investments and capacities to vulnerable households and community groups for holistic responses to climate vulnerability and future changes.

The project will complement the existing baseline by promoting long-term planning on climate changes and facilitating budgeting and establishment of innovative financing mechanisms to support climate change governance at communes’ levels. More specifically, the project will review local development plans (including RNC plans) to (i) integrate climate adaptation priorities and resilience, (ii) set up innovative & sustainable financial mechanisms, (iii) improve the capacity of local credit and saving mutuals to finance adaptation projects and also the performance of local leaders in managing adaptations finances.

The response to climate vulnerability and changes will be oriented toward investing on the restoration of key livelihood resources (natural reserves, pastures, water points, etc.), establishing minimum community based early warning systems and sustaining climate-resilient agro pastoral and diversification activities. Target communities, local government leaders and other supporting institutions, will receive support to build capacity on climate change to inform improved decision making. This is critical for informing the design of feasible, credible and useful adaptation options and support. 

 

This innovative approach allows local government to make changes to planning instruments that affect existing local developments by incorporating climate change considerations. Through the project, communities will have access to funding from a number of competitive grants (public & private) to address adaptation issues.

The coordination arrangement, involving policy makers, extension services, private sector and community based organisations, is a major innovation and will help to articulate institutional communication - both educational and social - at different levels.

The overall project will also generate socio-economic benefits at the local level by involving communities in the 203 villages (at least 50,000 households) in a much more transitional approach in the use of natural resources through the dissemination of practices, technologies and techniques, which are expected to improve the productivity and the resilience of agro-sylvo -pastoral activities.

Long-term benefits are also expected with investment aiming at restoring communities' "Natural Capital," and providing relevant climate information. In term of sustainability , the decentralized entities (councils and villages) will be empowered in implementing adaptation investments, strengthening community organizations in order to ensure that physical infrastructure and other investments are well managed and maintained after the project closure.

Capacity-building initiatives and awareness-raising will achieved through the social and environmental sustainability, and stakeholder involvement will be strengthened through adequate social mobilization and sensitization initiatives (workshops, forums, publications, community radios’ programmes, etc.). In addition, the knowledge base will be improved, and the project will define and implement an adequate system for knowledge management and information sharing.

The natural regions of Ferlo, Niokolo Koba, Bas Delta Senegal, and Delta du Saloum play a key role for livelihoods, as the communities are directly dependent on their natural assets, such as water, pasture, forests and fertile soil for a living.

Recognizing this richness, the communities of 203 villages established about 26 Community Natural Reserves (RNC) as well as nine credit and saving mutuals to improve the living conditions of households, specifically women groups.

However, with the effects climate change, both the natural capital maintained under these RNC and people’s economic assets will reach a tipping point. Indeed, in Senegal, droughts are the result of climate variability that more recently has manifested by a late onset of the rainy season, irregular spatial distribution of rains, and an early end to the rainy season.

Projections of mean annual rainfall averaged over the country show a trend towards decreases, particularly in the wet season. The drastic reductions in water availability at critical times (e.g. in the dry season or in drought years) and at critical locations (e.g. in the more populous areas or where livestock congregates) have direct and catastrophic impact on livelihoods of communities.

Natural grazing grounds in Niokolo Koba & Ferlo will be significantly diminished and livestock watering made difficult under climate change scenarios. This situation leads to localized conflicts between transhumant and sedentary communities, especially during the drought periods, when grazing grounds and water resources are particularly scarce.

Among other predictable impacts, climate change is also expected to result in a marked increase in the incidence and intensity of bushfires in Niokolo Koba & Ferlo. Fire can have catastrophic impacts on livelihoods, notably because of the importance of pastoral resources in target regions . 

In Bas Delta Senegal , most of villages are facing a serious coastal erosion problem; the outer row of fisher folk houses has already been destroyed by the sea and thus abandoned by the population

Finally, in Saloum Delta, the reduction of water table leads to the salinization of agricultural lands. Many valleys in Saloum are now affected by salted water intrusion resulting from reduced rainfall and lack of appropriate storage under changed conditions. Under these conditions, the capacity of communities will remain weak to sustain current efforts in preserving natural capital and increasing economical capital.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1 - C reate financial incentives linked with local government and communities financing systems to cover the incremental costs of climate change adaptation

Output 1.1. Identify and integrate climate resilience related performance measures into local development plans, including community plans

Output 1.2. Set up sustainable financial mechanisms at sub-national level (e.g. Local Resilience budget lines/funds, Eco taxes, etc.) to attract climate finance

Output 1.3. Sustainability & performance of the nine community based credit and saving mutuals improved to attract, manage and finance priority adaptation measures identified by vulnerable communities

Output 1.4. Capacity of communes and villages leaders developed to (i) access incremental funding from non-governmental sour ces, (ii) manage and (iii) monitor adaptation investments

Outcome 2 - Investments and capacities provided to vulnerable households and community groups for holistic responses to climate vulnerability and future changes

Output 2.1. Investments for structural adaptation measures channelled trough local budget (e.g. restoration of natural reserves/pastoral areas/water points, research development, Early Warning Systems, management of supply chains, etc.

Output 2.2. Create revolving investment funds, through credit & saving mutuals, for profitable community based climate resilient agro-pastoral investments and other diversification activities

Output 2.3. Community based organisation groups (women, youth and other producers) provided with capacity to (i) understand climate impacts; (ii) identify resilient growth production areas, (ii) manage adaptation initiatives (iii) access to rural finance, and (iv) improve entrepreneurship and organizational skills

Output 2.4. Mechanisms for capturing and dissemination of key experiences and good practices established for replication.

Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
GEF
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - C reate financial incentives linked with local government and communities financing systems to cover the incremental costs of climate change adaptation

Outcome 2 - Investments and capacities provided to vulnerable households and community groups for holistic responses to climate vulnerability and future changes

De-Risking and Scaling-Up Investment in Energy Efficient Building Retrofits - Armenia

The "De-Risking and Scaling-Up Investment in Energy Efficient Building Retrofits - Armenia" project will build the market for energy efficient building retrofits in Armenia, leading to sizeable energy savings and Green House Gas emission reductions (up to 5.8 million tons of Carbon Dioxide of direct and indirect emission savings over the 20-year equipment lifetimes). It will also lead to green job creation and energy poverty reduction. It will directly benefit over 200,000 people and will catalyse private and public sector investment of approximately US$100 million.

Through this project GCF will invest a US$14 million loan to make energy efficiency loans for building retrofits more affordable. The Municipality of Yerevan will add US$8 million in co-financing. In addition, GCF will provide US$6 million in technical assistance to remove market and policy barriers to building retrofits, with UNDP providing US$1.4 million and the Ministry of Nature Protection US$0.4 million co-funding. The technical assistance will seek to overcome lack of information and awareness about the benefits of retrofitting through the establishment of measurement, reporting and verification measures, the development of policy frameworks. The cost-effective combination of policy and financial de-risking instruments and targeted financial incentives will address market barriers and achieve a risk-return profile for EE building retrofits that can attract private investments.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
210,000 direct beneficiaries, 1700 jobs will be created, 1.4 million tons of carbon will be offset
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$20 million (GCF grant according to GCF website)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$9.8 million (US$8 million from Municipality of Yerevan, US$0.4 million from Ministry of Nature Protection, US$1.4 million from UNDP according to GCF website)
Project Details: 

Armenia is a small, poor, land-locked country in the heart of Eurasia, and is highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Unsustainable energy use in buildings underpins Armenia’s closely intertwined development, security and climate-related challenges. Approximately 30% of Armenian households are energy-poor, where energy poverty (often called ‘fuel poverty’) is defined as households spending more than 10% of their budgets on energy. Some 45% of apartments in multi-family buildings have indoor temperatures in winter below 19°C (i.e. below established international standards for human occupancy). About 50% of energy use in buildings depends on imported fossil fuels, and 4% of CO2 emissions come from energy use in buildings. With this in mind, over 50% of energy can be saved via energy efficient retrofits

Improving energy efficiency (EE) in buildings has been assigned the highest priority in Armenia’s housing, energy and climate strategies, including the country’s Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC), its Third National Communication to the UNFCCC and its UNFCCC Technology Needs Assessment.

UNDP will work with the Government, city administrations, the European Investment Bank, private sector stakeholders, ESCOs and local banks to deploy the most cost-effective combination of policy and financial de-risking instruments and targeted financial incentives to address market barriers and achieve a risk-return profile for energy efficient building retrofits that can attract private investments. The project builds on UNDP’s long experience supporting the Government of Armenia and on UNDP’s de-risking framework for low-carbon investment. It has the full backing of Armenia’s National Designated Authority (NDA) for the GCF, the UNFCCC National Focal Point, and the Municipality of Yerevan (home to one-third of Armenia’s population). The project is fully consistent with Armenia’s INDC.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Component 1 will establish building sector Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) and knowledge management. One of the identified barriers is a lack of information and awareness: energy efficiency is not a major concern for most people in Armenia. There is a low level of awareness among building owners, real estate agencies and occupants about operational costs and potential energy- and money-saving opportunities. There is also a misinformed perception that full compliance with efficient building codes and energy-efficient buildings would be prohibitively expensive in Armenia. The market for EE products and services is immature. Robust MRV will build the investment case for energy efficiency retrofits and, together with the dissemination of information, will support the communication of the financial and development gains to be made from energy efficiency investments, thus improving information availability and awareness of the benefits of buildings with improved energy performance.

Component 2 will support national, sub-national and local authorities to adopt and implement an enabling policy framework for energy efficiency retrofits. This will remove a number of policy, legal and institutional barriers through supporting legal reform, the introduction and implementation of regulation, and the modernisation and enforcement of standards. Component 2 will also remove technical and capacity barriers by providing technical assistance to selected market players, such as building owners / managers / owner associations and local government.

Component 3 will provide access to affordable capital for energy efficiency retrofits. This will help remove financial barriers, such as the fact that home-owners and public sector entities lack the financial resources necessary to undertake EE building retrofits without loans and the reluctance of local commercial banks to provide loans for EE renovation.

Component 4 grants from the GCF will be offered as a temporary targeted incentive. They will be targeted and will address the needs of the most vulnerable households. The financial analysis shows that, for those earning less than the median household income of US$400 per month, building retrofits are not affordable. For middle- and higher-income households, grants are not needed from an affordability point of view, and will only be used at a low level to overcome early-mover barriers. The grants will support poor and vulnerable households to secure access to improved thermal comfort and cost / energy savings. Incentive grants for low-income households are also needed to unlock building-level investments, as these households might otherwise block building-level investment decisions in multi-apartment buildings.

Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Component 1: Establishment of building sector Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV): Robust MRV for the building sector established

Component 2: Policy de-risking: National, sub-national and local authorities adopt and implement an enabling policy framework for EE retrofits

Component 3: Financial de-risking: Access to affordable capital for EE retrofits provided

Component 4: Financial incentives: Affordability of EE retrofits for the most vulnerable households ensured through targeted financial incentives to building / apartment owners (directly or via private-sector ESCOs)

Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA)

Climate stresses and low adaptive capacity are increasing Africa´s vulnerability to climate change. Climate related shocks to the economy, vulnerable populations, ecosystems and infrastructure threaten development goals and poverty alleviation strategies. The ability of decision-makers to understand and communicate the likely impacts of climate change is of critical importance in adapting development plans to new climate realities. However, the lack of access to reliable climate information and the lack of capacity of disseminating it prove to be significant obstacles in allowing governments and populations to develop the correct tools to address the changes that will be brought on as a result of climate change.

The Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) will enable vulnerable countries in Africa (Benin, Burkina Faso, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia) to strengthen national climate information systems as well as to benefit from regional coordination and draw upon a platform of knowledge management.

The CIRDA Programme will coordinate among different stakeholders needs and capacities in collecting, generating, analysing and disseminating relevant climate information. It will also provide capacity building on: meteorological, climate and hydrological observing and forecasting systems, disaster risk management and viable communication systems/processes for disseminating alerts, and the use of alternative cost-effective technologies. The Programme will provide special consideration on reaching end user populations such as farmers as well as strategies to engage with the private sector as a service provider and as an end user of climate information.

The multi-country programme is being implemented by UNDP with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Country Fund (LDCF) and is an example of the concrete actions that the UN is taking to reduce the impacts of climate change in all development sectors.

CIRDA Blog

 

 

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (38.320312491284 10.328754533132)
Funding Source: 

UNDP Climate Change Adaptation: Prevent Natural Disasters in Benin

Reports and Publications of relevance to Country Teams
Programme Related Events
Communications Products
Knowledge Products
Training & Tools
Reports and Publications by country teams
Newsletter
Brochures, Posters, Communications Products
News article
Board Meeting Reports
Planning Meeting Presentations
Project Brief / Fact Sheet
Nairobi Round Table on Strengthening Development of Climate Information and Early Warning Systems
ProDocs
Launch Workshop CIRDA
Project Details: 

The Multi Country Programme will support the following countries in Africa use climate information as a key tool in long term planning fundamental for economic development.

The Programme will strengthen the capacity of these countries and the region to develop and operate modern climate information and early warning systems by making available technical assistance and provide access to new technologies. Countries will also benefit from regional coordination and a knowledge sharing platform.

For up to date information on the CIRDA Programme and to engage in our ongoing discussions, make sure to check out our blog: http://undp-cirda.blogspot.com/

For a brief snapshot of the Programme, download the CIRDA Fact Sheet.

Bonizella Biagini

Dr. Bonizella (Boni) Biagini currently manages the UNDP’s Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA).

Prior to joining UNDP in 2014, Dr. Biagini worked at the Global Environment Facility (GEF) for 12 years, leading the creation and development of the GEF Adaptation program and project portfolio. She was the senior official responsible for mobilizing resources for the first two dedicated adaptation funds: the Least Developed Country Fund (LDCF) and the Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF), which together have received donor support of $1.5 billion.  Before joining the GEF, Dr. Biagini worked at several NGOs including the Climate, Energy and Pollution Program at the World Resources Institute and the international office of Legambiente, a leading Italian environmental research organization.

A physicist by training, Dr. Biagini has worked on climate change and other global environmental issues for 25 years in Europe, the United States, Africa, Asia, and several small island states. In addition to her technical skills, her background encompasses an unusual combination of operational experience on the ground and high-level participation in international environmental meetings including the Earth Summit and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Learn more about Dr. Biagini's work with the GEF Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF) and the Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF) in the May 2016 publication "Time to Adapt: Insights from the GEF's Experience in Adaptation to Climate Change." Dr. Biagini is also a contributor to the IPCC Third and Fourth Assessment Reports on Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, and the author of numerous publications on climate change science and policy, including the report “Confronting Climate Change, Economic Priorities and Climate Protection in Developing Nations.” (Biagini, 2000).  She is the lead author of three recent articles documenting experiences resulting from climate change adaptation projects:  “Engaging the Private Sector in Adaptation to Climate Change in Developing Countries” (Biagini, Miller, 2013), “A Typology of Adaptation Actions: A Global Look at Climate Adaptation Actions Financed Through the Global Environment Facility” (Biagini, Bierbaum, Stults, Dobardzic, McNeeley, 2014); and “Technology Transfer for Adaptation” (Biagini, Kuhl, Sims Gallagher, Ortiz, 2014). (Photo Courtesy Margherita Mirabella)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Climate Data Digitization

Overview
At the request of the governments of The Gambia, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, the UNDP Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) is taking steps to assist in the preservation of historic climate data in these six African Least Developed Countries.

In its initial phase of support, two experts were commissioned by the CIRDA Programme to meet with National Hydro-Meteorological Services (NHMS) to provide guidance on digitization efforts and create a plan to capture digital records, particularly data used to manage climate impacts on agriculture, fishing and floods. With new training support, three countries are now scaling up efforts to capture historic records and digitize tens of thousands of pages of historic climate archives.

Types of Climate Data
Climate data generally falls into two categories: historical data and data from recent and current observations.

While most people understand the importance of current and recent climate data, fewer appreciate the equal importance of historical climate data. Historical data allow one to establish long-term trends, which in turn helps us understand and better plan for future changes in climate. They also help in developing and refining climate models and seasonal forecasts, as well as provide the foundational datasets used for adaptation studies at local, national and regional scales.

Climate models are mathematical representations of the interactions between the atmosphere, oceans, land surface, ice and the sun. Once a climate model is developed, it has to be tested to find out if it works. And since we can’t wait for 30 years to see if a model is any good or not, the models have to be tested against the past in a process that is called “hindcasting” that rely on historical observations. The simple assumption of hindcasting is that if a model can correctly predict current trends from a starting point somewhere in the past, one can expect it to predict what might happen in the future.

History of Climate Data
Meteorological data observations in most African countries date back to the early 19th Century (for example, in Tanzania the first meteorological observation was made along the coast in 1850). Once recorded on paper, the observations are kept in various formats in data archives usually located at meteorological agency headquarters or even still at the stations where the measurements were originally taken. But this historical data is recorded largely on paper and, depending on the age of the paper and the condition of the archives, some of the data is unreadable or is wearing out at dramatic rates, due to handwritten ink that fades over time. 

Initial Needs Assessment
During an initial needs assessment, only Malawi reported having partial access to digitized historic data, with other countries often reporting no central digital archive of these data existing. One reason for this is that historic climate data sets are often held by other agencies aside from the NHMS. Alternative agencies holding historic data sets often include the Ministries of Agriculture, Water, Transport and Education.

Why Digitization is Important
Climate data is an essential ingredient needed to develop weather/climate-based early warning systems and a cornerstone for resilience building efforts. It not only allows us to monitor adverse impacts across development sectors, populations and ecosystems, but it also helps countries to prepare for and adapt to the realities of climate change. This information can be analyzed and applied to protect development gains and aid in the achievement of National Adaptation Plan goals. It is also an essential ingredient in creating more accurate forecasts that can be used to track storms, protect lives and build more resilient livelihoods. Unfortunately, in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, these important data – often recorded with pen and paper – is being lost at a remarkable rate. Civil War, material decay and the sands of time are literally erasing the historical record of climate in the region.

The Strategy
National digitization strategies depend on a number of factors, including where and how data is stored, legal frameworks, in-house capacity, budgets, and equipment. Generally speaking, and often utilizing external funding, governments electronically capture paper records into a database with the first step being to record digital images of the data using a scanner or digital camera. This ensures that a digital copy of the record is preserved and can be be shared. However, the data itself is not yet in a digital form where it can be used to make calculations or for computational analyses. This requires either manually keying the records into a digital database, using software such as ClimSoft or Excel, or using automatic character recognition software to read, analyze and warehouse the new digital archive. Each variable and data set is important for improved weather forecasting and historical climate tracking, with different variables being used in different applications e.g. wind speed, humidity, temperature and incident radiation all important to calculate evaporation which is used model hydrological flows and crop development. An example of some of the main data useful for climate applications are given below:

Top Level Data Sets

  • Rainfall
  • Temperatures
  • Wind speed and direction
  • Humidity
  • Sunshine duration
  • Incident solar radiation
  • River Discharge
  • Salinity
  • Surface Water levels

Resources and Further Reading

Images

From top to botton: Historic records in The Gambia, where the archive is not in a good state, but recent records are intact; handheld data recue efforts in Uganda; and the Tanzania Meteorological Department's historic archive.

Programme Outputs

UNDP's CIRDA Programme provides support to 11 vulnerable countries African countries in their efforts to enhance their capacity to collect, analyze and disseminate climate information as a tool in adaptation planning. It does so by providing expert technical advice, promoting regional cooperation efforts, and capacity building.The support provided by the CIRDA Programme is in addition to each countries efforts to implement individual national climate information/early warning projects.

Click below to learn about some recent on the ground achievements:

Uganda

Zambia

Benin

Sao Tome and Principe

Tanzania

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Implementation of the CIRDA Programme is carried out under the general guidance of a Project Board composed of senior-level representatives from UNDP-GEF, WMO, UN-SPIDER, and representatives from 3 UNDP Country Offices.

The Project Board is the strategic decision-making body of the project, providing overall guidance and direction to the CIRDA Programme Manager.

II Board Meeting- 2015

A CIRDA Project Board Meeting was held in Kampala, Uganda on March 5, 2015. The meeting was held to present the Programme's 2015 Annual Work Plan and Budget, both were approved by all board members.

Click here for Board Meeting Minutes

Click here for the Board Meeting Presentation

I Board Meeting- 2014

The first Project Board Meeting was held on July 8, 2014. The meeting's objective was the presentation of CIRDA's Annual Work Plan and Budget, both which were unanimously approved.

Click Here for the Board Meeting Minutes

Click Here for the Board Meeting Presentation

Contacts: 
UNDP-GEF
Bonizella Biagini
Programme Manager
UNDP-GEF
Montserrat Xilotl
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

‘The Last Mile’

Saving lives, improving livelihoods and increasing resiliency with tailored weather information services
for a changing climate

15-17 March, 2016, Livingstone, Zambia

Climate information and early warning systems can save lives, improve livelihoods and build resiliency across Africa. In order to seize this opportunity, timely, accurate and actionable weather and climate information must be delivered from data collection and creation sources across the “Last Mile” to uninformed and vulnerable end-users.

In this innovation-driven multi-country workshop, experts on cutting-edge technology, communications, public-private partnerships, meteorology and sustainable development will come together to explore new pathways to move from the collection of data to its application, with the end goal of creating actionable recommendations that UNDP-supported climate-information programmes can leverage to impact lives and build sustainability. For this to happen, national weather information services should not only have access to modern weather observation technologies and forecast information, but they must also be able to communicate and apply the content derived from these systems to those in need.

Interactive sessions will cover diverse topics beginning with the sharing of best practices on the application of weather data in the field, followed by sessions and panel discussions that explore important topics that will guide our journey toward the “Last Mile.” These include defining roles and responsibilities of public and private information goods, establishing key partnerships required for the design, development and potential commercialization of “Last Mile” products and services, and developing integrated communications strategies. A notable side event, The Climate Action Hackathon, will also take place in parallel to generate ideas for Last Mile products and services from the application development community and local media.

Ample time will be provided for interactive discussion between project managers, implementing agency officials and the Last Mile application development community in order to more deeply explore the development of workshop ideas within each national project.

Main Goals

  • Understand challenges and opportunities for UNDP-supported Climate Information and Early Warning Systems projects as we journey toward the last mile
  • Share best practices, innovative technologies and cutting-edge methodologies
  • Define actionable recommendations to cover the “Last Mile”
  • Build relationships and partnerships
  • Ensure long-term sustainability
  • Embrace innovation
  • Connect, listen, explore

Resources

Presentations - Day 1

Presentations - Day 2

Country Presentations

Mobile APP

Climate Action Hackathon

Big Ideas, Visionaries, Amateur Forecasters and Computer Developers Welcome at UNDP Climate Information for a Resilient Africa Event. Learn More

 


 

25-27 August, 2015, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

UNDP CIRDA Country Project Managers Workshop

This workshop hosted by the UNDP’s Programme on Climate Information for Resilient Development in Africa (CIRDA) brings together country project managers, technical advisories, meteorologists and hydrologists, and experts on public-private partnerships, communications and development to explore innovative approaches and new technologies to strengthen and sustain climate information and early warning systems in Africa.

The meeting offers an opportunity for collaboration and knowledge sharing between in-country leadership teams from 11 African nations. Sessions focus on technical support mission planning, reports from the Strengthening National Climate Information/Early Warning System (CI/EWS) Projects, public-private partnership market studies, support for the procurement of Hydro-Meteorological technology, and covering the “Last Mile.”

Unique country clinics bring country project managers together with experts from the CIRDA Programme to discuss innovative climate and weather information
technologies, new approaches and cutting-edge applications of climate data.

The meeting is hosted at the UNDP Regional Service Center for Africa (RSC). Powerpoint presentations and videos from the event will be shared on this page as they become available.

Links

Presentations

Introductions, Meeting Goals and Strategies

Reports from Strengthening National Climate Information/ Early Warning System (CI/EWS) Projects

Day 1

Day 2

Videos

 


 


 

3 March, 2015, Kampala, Uganda- Workshop on Creating Value Added Weather and Climate Services through Innovative Public Private Partnerships

The UNDP-CIRDA Programme and the Government of Uganda held a training workshop at the Golf Course Hotel in Kampala aimed at building sustainable climate change adaptation and economic development plans. The workshop will support National Hydrological and Meteorological Services (NHMS) in Africa create value added weather and climate services by engaging with the private sector and developing innovative public private partnerships. 

The workshop brought together government representatives, the private sector, international experts, representatives from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and UNDP.  Discussions were held with representatives from agriculture, financial, aviation and telecommunication sectors on how to  meet their needs and best engage them through the use of new technologies to communicate timely and reliable climate information to support national development. 

Long term financial sustainability of national weather and climate services was a key topic  addressed during this two day event.  As governments deal with budget constraints on many fronts, limited budget resources are a challenge for NHMS in their attempts meet the information needs of local populations. Conversations were centered on analyzing the potential for generating revenue to support the sustainability of weather and climate services, including opportunities for collaboration with mobile phone companies and establishing succesful public private partnerships. These discussions led to the development of country action plans to provide a pathway forward in CIRDA's 11 partner countries.

Workshop Agenda

Workshop Logistic Note

Official Press Release

Workshop Minutes

Action Plans

Presentations:

Day 1

Day 2

CIRDA Partner Country Presentations

 


 

14 October, 2014, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania- Workshop on a Systems Approach to Designing, Implementing, and Utilizing Observing Networks

UNDP’s Multi Country Support Programme to Strengthen Climate Information and Resilience Development in Africa (CIRDA), in close collaboration with the UNDP Country Office in Tanzania, held a training workshop on a Systems Approach to Designing, Implementing, and Utilizing Observing Networks from 14 to16 October, 2014, at the Hotel White Sands in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

The workshop provided training to Directors of the National Meteorology and Hydrology Services (NHMS), Directors of the NHMS Observation Networks, CIRDA country managers, and other interested CIRDA partners, by introducing a systems approach to the design, implementation, and utilization of observing networks. Training sessions were led by international professionals in the fields of meteorology, surface observations, data quality, private sector engagement, and climate technologies. The event also provided an opportunity for country representatves to present their progress on implementing local and national early warning systems (EWS) with the support of the Programme. The workshop discussion resulted in the development of country posters that detailed national observing networks.

Click here for the agenda workshop

Workshop Participants

Links to Presentations:

Click here to see a video on the EWS in Benin and its success in alerting local populations on hazardous floodings.

Click here for a fact sheet on Sao Tome and Principe's EWS

Country posters detailing national observing networks

 


 

20 May, 2014, Nairobi, Kenya- Roundtable on Strengthening Development of Weather, Climate and Hydrology related Early Warning Systems in Africa

Development banks, intergovernmental agencies and meteorological services working in Africa to support the development of climate information and early warning systems across Africa met in Nairobi to communicate and raise awareness of ongoing and planned iniatives.  This event is an example of the ongoing  coordination between programmes and agencies to assure that all iniatives are in keeping with development and adaptation needs. Discussions served to highlight the complementary nature of regional activities directed at enhancing climate information systems. 

CIRDA Programme Manager, Bonizella Biagini, presented the aims, objectives, actions and scope of the CIRDA Programme.

Click here for presentation.

Presentations were also made by representatives from UNESCO, WMO, AFDB, Kenya's Metorological Service, ICPAC, NDMA, UNEP and the UN's International System for Disaster Reduction.

For a full summary of the event, click here.

 


 

13 April, 2014, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia- Launch of the Multi Country Support Programme to Strengthen Climate Information Systems in Africa

Representatives from UNDP's GEF Unit met in Ethiopia on April 13-14 with high level representatives from Benin, Liberia, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Sao Tome and Principe, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia to launch the Multi Country Support Programme to Strengthen Climate Information Systems in Africa. The Honorable Ministers of Environment from Uganda, Sao Tome and Principe as well as the Executive Chairperson of the Environment Protection Agency of Sierra Leone were present to celebrate the Programme's onset.

As a highlight to the workshop, an Expo with 13 meteorological companies and service providers was held to introduce government representatives to the cutting edge technologies available in the collection, processing and dissemination of climate information.

Agenda

Links to Presentations

Workshop Participants

 

Map Caption: 

The CIRDA Programme is based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and provides technical support and expertise to Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems Projects in 11 African least developed countries.

 


 

News and Updates: 

CIRDA Blog

 

Video Playlist

Livefeed - Climate Action Hackathon - Leveraging Weather and Climate Data to Create Solutions for Adaptation

May 24, 2016, 18:30 (CEST) Bonn, Germany | Post questions on Twitter @unfccc_ccstudio
With obsolete or malfunctioning technologies, dozens of local languages, high-levels of illiteracy, and limited electricity and access to media, many vulnerable communities in Africa do not receive reliable weather reports, and only a few nations possess the ability to issue early warning messages and reach the “last mile.” In response to this challenge, this past March in Zambia the UNDP’s CIRDA Programme launched a Climate Action Hackathon. The event engaged young African developers to create innovative software focused on communicating directly with end users. The livestream of the side event at the May Bonn Climate Change Conference will present a practical demonstration of the innovative solutions that were developed by the hackers to provide weather information for specific end users, including farmers, vulnerable communities and policymakers to inform adaptation actions. The side event will also introduce the results of a Market Study on revenue generating opportunities for weather services in Africa.

CIRDA and CI/EWS Projects In The News

New GEF Least Developed Countries Fund Project Supported by UNDP to Detect Lightning in Uganda - 20 May 2016
...The Uganda National Meteorological Authority (UNMA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have joined hands to strengthen climate information and early-warning systems [in Uganda]. Their initiative would, among other things, detect lightning and inform people to move away from known lighting hotspots...

 

Procurement Assistance

As part of the CIRDA Programme’s objective to enhance national capacities in monitoring and forecasting extreme weather, hydrology and climate change, UNDP-GEF and UNDP's Procurement Support Office (PSO) have established a collaboration framework under the CIRDA Programme to support  partner countries in the procurement of weather, climate and hydrological monitoring infrastructure and new technologies.

Procurement support includes: a) reviewing technical specifications and Terms of Refrence (ToRs) developed by requisitioning units & projects; b) feedback and recommendations pertaining the suitability of technical specifications/requirements to conduct procurement processes; c) market research and sourcing activities to ensure awareness and interest of relevant supplier base; d) review of procurement documents submitted by requisitioning units/projects; e) assistance to Country Offices (COs) & projects with procurement related clarifications during tender processes; f) reviewing submissions to contract review committees and provide recommendations to COs and projects; g) assistance and backstopping support to ensure satisfactory completion of vendor’s contractual obligations and; h) developing managing and maintaining, suitable procurement tools, systems, mechanisms, agreements and contracts to ensure reliable on-going supply chain mechanisms.

In collaboration with CIRDA experts on alternative technologies, the PSO Unit has developed a fact sheet to serve as a support guide to partner countries in their efforts to procure new technologies.

The PSO Unit has also created an online platform with various resources to help country offices and partners. This information is available at the following websites:

UNDP-GEF Procurement Tools & Knowledge Sharing

Long Term Agreements (LTAs) and their corresponding Standard Operation Procedures (SOP)

For any questions please feel free to contact Mettelena Herring at mettelena.herring@undp.org

Display Photo: 

Africa Adaptation Programme

The Africa Adaptation Programme was launched in 2008 by the United Nations Development Programme in partnership with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP) and with US$92.1 million support from the Government of Japan. The AAP was established under the Japan-UNDP Joint Framework for Building Partnership to Address Climate Change in Africa, which was founded at the Fourth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD) in May 2008.

Over a 3 year period, concluding at the end of 2012, AAP instituted transformational changes in the 20 African countries in the areas of 1) long-term planning; 2) leadership and institutional capacity; 3) climate-resilient policies and measures; 4) innovative finance; and 5) knowledge generation and sharing.  AAP’s support helped enhance the adaptive capacity of the AAP countries, promote early adaptation action and lay the foundation for long-term investment to increase resilience to climate change across the African continent.

The 20 AAP countries were: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Morocco, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome Principe, Senegal, Tanzania, and Tunisia.

Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-17.2265625065 14.8173706265)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$92,100,000
Project Details: 

Africa is particularly vulnerable to climate change. It will exacerbate the economic, political and humanitarian stresses that countries in the region already face, and greatly reduce their capacity to eradicate extreme poverty. The poorest segments of society will be the most severely affected because they are also the least able to adapt. Responding to the threat of climate change will require concerted action on an unprecedented scale. Systematic action will be required across all levels of development planning and implementation (regional, national, sub-national, and local) if development in a number of countries is not to be reversed.

Some African countries have identified key vulnerabilities and priority adaptation measures, and others have initiated demonstration adaptation projects. However, countries continue to face a number of challenges including the following: (i) adaptation initiatives are limited in scope and scale, and their impacts are neither cohesive nor sustainable; (ii) institutional capacities, relationships, policies and practices to assess and manage climate change risks are not developed sufficiently to create an enabling environment, with corresponding political and social champions to support the formulation and implementation of efficient solutions to a problem that has complex multi-sectoral effects; (iii) limited knowledge of the most appropriate adaptation policies and measures hinders countries from preparing themselves with the necessary institutional capacities to support climate risk management; (iv) limited financing options to sustain scaled-up adaptation remains a constraint; and (v) it is difficult for countries to learn from each other about their experiences with different approaches to adaptation.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

During the three years of its implementation (2010-2012), AAP laid the groundwork for an ongoing, dynamic adaptation process in harmony with each country’s social, environmental and economic priorities. In all 20 countries, AAP has nourished an environment in which decisions and activities in support of adaptation can be evidence-based, strategic and appropriate to the goals of sustainable development, resulting in long-term investment to increase resilience to climate change.

Strengthening Long-Term Planning Mechanisms

AAP’s Data and Information Management Component (DIMC) assisted countries to develop the infrastructure and capabilities needed to access, analyse and apply climate data and information for decision-making. Overall, over 10,000 people were trained in climate data analysis under AAP’s DIMC.  AAP’s support under DIMC helped increase countries’ capacity to support vulnerability and risk assessments and use climate data and information to integrate adaptation into national development planning.

Building Institutional and Leadership Capacity

AAP assisted in enhancing professional leadership capacity and institutional effectiveness in countries by increasing awareness of climate change issues, developing multi-stakeholder approaches and implementing national adaptation strategies that address the needs of men and women equally.   For example, under AAP, Kenya established a National Climate Change Secretariat to coordinate the different climate change focal points in key government ministries. Through this multi-ministerial coordination, Kenya has facilitated the National Climate Change Response Strategy and ensured adaptation interventions take a multi-sectoral approach.

Implementing Climate-Resilient Policies and Measures

AAP provided assistance to countries to implement policy measures that protect climate sensitive sectors and encourage private sector investment in adaptation, such as adaptation pilot projects and national climate change strategies.  For example, Nigeria, with the support of AAP, adopted a National Policy on Climate Change and Response Strategy, which will ensure a coordinated approach to addressing climate change.

Innovative Finance

Under AAP, innovative financing options to meet national adaptation costs were expanded at the local, national, sub-regional and regional levels. For example, AAP supported Morocco to expand public-private partnerships to mobilise funds for future climate change projects in local communities.  Through a public-private partnership developed through AAP, a solar lighting project was completed in a rural community.  Additionally, AAP trained stakeholders to undertake cost-benefit analyses of adaptation options.

Generating and Sharing Knowledge

Through AAP, knowledge on adjusting national development processes to fully incorporate climate change risks and opportunity was generated and shared across all levels across all 20 countries. For example, the production and broadcast of television and radio segments (e.g. Burkina Faso, Mauritius, Namibia, and Tunisia) and documentaries (e.g. Cameroon, Kenya, Morocco, Rwanda, Senegal and Tanzania) effectively shared information and concerns on climate change adaptation.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Jen Stephens
Climate Specialist
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 


 

Strategic Planning and Action to strengthen climate Resilience of Communities in Nusa Tenggara Timor province (SPARC)

The project will apply a holistic approach to improve rural livelihoods and food security by strengthening climate resilience. It will work simultaneously at the policy and grassroots levels. It will create continuous dialogue between these levels and stakeholders involved to ensure that policies to be developed or revised are based on needs and lessons learned from the grassroots.

The climate induced problem that this project is focused on is that the impacts of the ongoing and projected changes in climate will very likely exceed the coping capacity of many rural communities. This will result in decreasing security in terms of livelihoods, food and water, affecting rural development in NTT. Rural communities in NTT are highly dependent on the climate for their subsistence agricultural production and water resources. Ensuring food and water security is already a major challenge. Underlying causes of the problem include 1) Systemic vulnerabilities are high due to geographical and geophysical factors (remote and archipelagic area, with a naturally high climate variability); 2) Slow development progress in NTT (e.g. short term planning, reactive responses to problems, poor infrastructure and communication network); 3) Decentralization challenges (e.g. ineffective coordination, little attention to capacity development for sub-national institutions, 4) Community challenges such as low education levels, cultural perspectives on adopting new approaches and practices.

The project will focus on strengthening and developing climate resilient institutions and rural communities centred around livelihoods, food and water security. In particular, it will support the following long-term solution: 1) Local government (including both provincial and district governments) has integrated climate resilience principles in policy, planning and budgeting, and have the institutional capacity to develop, implement and monitor this; and 2) Communities will strengthen and diversify their livelihoods in anticipation of further changes in the climate and its impacts. Identified barriers that local government and the communities are facing to improve livelihoods, food security and water security in a changing climate include informational, policy, financial, individual, and institutional barriers, with gender cutting across these.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (120.695800781 -8.63100145604)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Villages in Nusa Tenggara Timor province
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
5,000,000 (GEF/SCCF), 100,000 (UNDP)
Co-Financing Total: 
6,337,332 (UNDP), 67,873,318 (Government of NTT)
Project Details: 

Rural communities in Nusa Tenggara Timur [NTT] are highly dependent on the climate for their subsistence agricultural production and water resources. Ensuring food and water security is already a major challenge. The climate-induced problem that this project is focused on is that the mpacts of the ongoing and projected changes in climate will very likely exceed the coping capacity of many rural communities. This will result in decreasing security in terms of livelihoods, food and water, affecting rural development in NTT.

SCCF funding will focus on strengthening and developing climate resilient institutions and rural communities centred around livelihoods, food and water security, to pave the way for climate resilient development in NTT. In particular, it will support the following long-term solution with regard to:

1. Local government and climate resilient development
2. Climate resilient rural communities

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

At the national level, the project will address climate resilience in terms of food, water and livelihood security in NTT, serving as a model for climate resilient development in an increasingly decentralized Indonesia. The project will thus contribute to MDG 1– Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger. Progress on this is of particular importance to NTT because the province has the highest prevalence of underweight children under five years of age, and almost a quarter of the NTT population is below the national poverty line.

Expected project outcomes are:
1. Institutional capacity developed to integrate climate resilience in sustainable development at provincial and district level
2. Livelihoods of vulnerable rural communities strengthened in a changing climate

At the provincial level, SCCF resources will be used to raise awareness, develop institutional capacity, and to integrate climate resilience in development planning, programmes and budgeting. This will indirectly benefit the whole population of NTT, which are 4.7 million people (about 960,000 households).

At the district level, SCCF resources will be invested in 3 districts for integrating climate resilience in district level development planning and programmes and access to knowledge and information, reaching out to all villages and households in these districts:
• Sabu Raijua which has a population size of 91,870 people (18,869 households), living in 58 villages (Desa) and 5 urban neighborhoods (Kelurahan). 
• East Sumba which has a population size of 225,906 people (46,465 households), living in 140 villages and 16 urban neighborhoods
• Manggarai which has a population of 512,065 (105,323 households) living in 132 villages and 17 urban neighborhoods

Out of these 330 villages, SCCF resources will be directly invested in 120 villages (approximately 34,000 households) to develop community vulnerability reduction assessments, community action plans, strengthen resilience of existing livelihoods, introduce alternative livelihoods, and develop climate resilient water resources management, to integrate climate resilience in community development plans, and to develop community based climate risk information system.
 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The project will be monitored through the following M& E activities:

Project start: 
A Project Inception Workshop will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan.

The Inception Workshop should address a number of key issues including:
a) Assist all partners to fully understand and take ownership of the project. Detail the roles, support services and complementary responsibilities of UNDP CO and RCU staff vis à vis the project team.  Discuss the roles, functions, and responsibilities within the project's decision-making structures, including reporting and communication lines, and conflict resolution mechanisms.  The Terms of Reference for project staff will be discussed again as needed.
b) Based on the project results framework and the relevant SOF (e.g. GEF) Tracking Tool if appropriate, finalize the first annual work plan.  Review and agree on the indicators, targets and their means of verification, and recheck assumptions and risks. 
c) Provide a detailed overview of reporting, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) requirements.  The Monitoring and Evaluation work plan and budget should be agreed and scheduled.
d) Discuss financial reporting procedures and obligations, and arrangements for annual audit.
e) Plan and schedule Project Board meetings.  Roles and responsibilities of all project organisation structures should be clarified and meetings planned.  The first Project Board meeting should be held within the first 12 months following the inception workshop.

An Inception Workshop report is a key reference document and must be prepared and shared with participants to formalize various agreements and plans decided during the meeting. 

Quarterly:
Progress made shall be monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Managment Platform.
Based on the initial risk analysis submitted, the risk log shall be regularly updated in ATLAS.  Risks become critical when the impact and probability are high.  Note that for UNDP GEF projects, all financial risks associated with financial instruments such as revolving funds, microfinance schemes, or capitalization of ESCOs are automatically classified as critical on the basis of their innovative nature (high impact and uncertainty due to no previous experience justifies classification as critical).
Based on the information recorded in Atlas, a Project Progress Reports (PPR) can be generated in the Executive Snapshot.
Other ATLAS logs can be used to monitor issues, lessons learned etc. The use of these functions is a key indicator in the UNDP Executive Balanced Scorecard.

Annually:
 Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR):  This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and SOF (e.g. GEF) reporting requirements. 

The APR/PIR includes, but is not limited to, reporting on the following:
• Progress made toward project objective and project outcomes - each with indicators, baseline data and end-of-project targets (cumulative) 
• Project outputs delivered per project outcome (annual).
• Lesson learned/good practice.
• AWP and other expenditure reports
• Risk and adaptive management
• ATLAS QPR
• Portfolio level indicators (i.e. GEF focal area tracking tools) are used by most focal areas on an annual basis as well. 

Periodic Monitoring through site visits:
UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-term of project cycle:
The project will undergo an independent Mid-Term Evaluation at the mid-point of project implementation (insert date).  The Mid-Term Evaluation will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed. It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  The organization, terms of reference and timing of the mid-term evaluation will be decided after consultation between the parties to the project document. The Terms of Reference for this Mid-term evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.  The management response and the evaluation will be uploaded to UNDP corporate systems, in particular the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC). 

The relevant SOF (GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the mid-term evaluation cycle.

End of Project:
An independent Final Evaluation will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and SOF (e.g. GEF) guidance. The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals. The Terms of Reference for this evaluation will be prepared by the UNDP CO based on guidance from the Regional Coordinating Unit and UNDP-EEG.

The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities and requires a management response which should be uploaded to PIMS and to the UNDP Evaluation Office Evaluation Resource Center (ERC). 

The relevant SOF (e.g GEF) Focal Area Tracking Tools will also be completed during the final evaluation.

During the final three months, the project team will prepare the Project Terminal Report. This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lay out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and knowledge sharing:
Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects. Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this and related projects.

Audit: 
Project audit will follow UNDP Financial Rules and Regulations, and applicable Audit policies.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Alex Heikens
Regional Policy Advisor - Climate Change
UNDP
Tom Twining-Ward
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SCCF
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Establishing the Ghana Environmental Conventions Coordination Authority (GECCA)

The proposed project is designed to improve coordination structures and mechanisms so that stakeholders in Ghana are addressing climate change related needs in an effective manner. The proposed project will first help the Government to merge all existing management structures at national level into one structure consisting of the Ghana Environmental Conventions Coordinating Authority (GECCA) and its Secretariat. The project will then help these mechanisms become operational by building their capacity and supporting them to perform specific tasks. Finally, the project will help these mechanisms provide support to five pilot districts, in order to build national level capacity to support districts. A series of impact indicators are provided in the logical framework. The result will be a far more coherent, streamlined and effective allocation of resources to meeting the Rio obligations. In turn, it is expected that this increased efficiency will attract additional investors to support Ghana as it meets its Rio Convention obligations.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-0.205074754545 5.56545023808)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Through improved identification of national circumstances, government agencies and other actors will increase their abilities to insulate at risk urban and rural populations from the adverse effects of climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
480,000
Co-Financing Total: 
280,000
Project Details: 

Ghana lies just above the Equator along the Gulf of Guinea in West Africa. It has a surface area of 239,000 km2 and a coastal shoreline of approximately 550km. Ghana has a population of approximately 20 million people and a GDP per capita of US$380. Following several years of stagnation, the economy has been growing annually by around 5% over the past five years. Agriculture accounts for 38% of the GDP and employs approximately 60% of the population, including the vast majority of the rural poor in Ghana. A total of 40 % of the population are estimated to be living in poverty, including the majority of rural people (further details are provided in Section C.2.1).

Economic activity in Ghana largely depends upon natural resources. For example, the timber, cocoa, minerals, and fish sectors contribute 48 percent of GDP, 90 percent of foreign export earnings and 70 percent of total employment. However, Ghana’s natural resources are being depleted at an alarming rate. More than 50 percent of the original forest area has been converted to agricultural land by slash and burn clearing practices. Fish, timber and non-timber forest product stocks are decreasing. Coastal towns face severe water shortages during the dry season and hydropower capacity is dropping. Despite expansion of cocoa land, productivity has declined due to rampant soil erosion. The annual cost of the degradation of Ghana’s renewable natural assets is estimated to be equal to 5.5 percent of its annual GDP, i.e. US$475 million. This degradation of the natural resource base undermines the government’s economic growth and poverty reduction strategies.

Ghana has very significant global environmental assets. In terms of biodiversity, the forest, savannah, wetland and coastal ecosystems provide a diverse range of habitats. These habitats contain at least 2975 plant species, 728 birds, 225 mammals and 221 reptiles. This species diversity is an indicator of the overall biodiversity in the country. In terms of climate change, Ghana is a net sink of climate changing gases, due largely to its forest cover and low level of industrialization. However, the net sink values are falling rapidly, notably due to land-use change. The greatest implications of climate change for Ghana are its vulnerability to change and the need for adaptation. Climate change models forecast serious implications of climate change, particularly in the water, agriculture and coastal zone sectors in Ghana. These would cause serious problems to the economy and further undermine efforts to alleviate poverty. Finally, with respect to land degradation, Ghana was quick to realise its vulnerability to desertification in the early 1980s following a series of droughts and bushfires. According to the National Action Programme, unsustainable land and water management in combination with local climate change have already led to severe land degradation over significant parts of Ghana. This is exacerbated by unsustainable levels of deforestation. Thirty five percent of the land is considered prone to desertification.

In order to address the above challenges, Ghana has ratified the three Rio Conventions and taken active steps to meet its obligations. Ghanaian stakeholders recently undertook a comprehensive, participatory assessment of the capacities needed to implement the Rio Conventions – the National Capacity Self-Assessment (NCSA). This Assessment was the first time that the stakeholders for all three Conventions had worked together. Through this process, they recognized that they have common functions and tasks, have shared resources, and face common challenges and constraints. It quickly became obvious that they should work more closely together, to pool resources and to fuse much of their work programmes.

During the Assessment, an in-depth analysis of convention obligations and in-country priorities identified the following needs that apply to all three Rio Conventions:

  • The need to mainstream Convention concerns into economic and sectoral policies, programmes and practices
  • The need to ensure the effective participation of stakeholders in efforts to implement the Conventions
  • The need for strong knowledge management
  • The need to improve two-way reporting between the country and the Convention
  • The need to mobilise resources
  • The need to technically and politically support stakeholders in the districts

Stakeholders in all three Conventions recognized that strengthened capacity to address these needs would lead to better management of natural resources, and in turn to better implementation of the Convention and positive impacts on the environment. Given the strong nexus between poverty and the global environment, the strengthened capacity would also contribute to poverty alleviation. Moreover, it was recognized that efforts to address these needs should be taken jointly, and not by each Convention in isolation. Accordingly, a priority recommendation of the Assessment was to strengthen coordination in order to more effectively address the above needs. It is noted that this situation applies to all Conventions, not only the Rio Conventions.

Hence the proposed project is to improve coordination structures and mechanisms, so that stakeholders in Ghana are addressing the above needs in an effective manner. The proposed project will first help the Government to merge all existing management structures at national level into one structure consisting of the Ghana Environmental Conventions Coordinating Authority (GECCA) and its Secretariat. The project will then help these mechanisms become operational by building their capacity and supporting them to perform specific tasks. Finally, the project will help these mechanisms provide support to five pilot districts, in order to build national level capacity to support districts. A series of impact indicators are provided in the logical framework. The result will be a far more coherent, streamlined and effective allocation of resources to meeting the Rio obligations. In turn, it is expected that this increased efficiency will attract additional investors to support Ghana as it meets its Rio Convention obligations 

The project builds on a significant baseline consisting of national initiatives and international projects, most notably those supported by UNDP, UNEP-GEF and the Canadian Government. The project will help the Government to bring all these initiatives into one coherent structure. Sustainability will be assured through:

  • The benefits generated through increased coordination will provide an incentive for Government follow-up
  • Realistically, the international community can be expected to continue providing some core support to Ghana as it implements the Rio Conventions
  • The long-term financial requirements for the coordination structures are low

Environmental impacts: The project will have a direct impact on the environment nationally, resulting from the capacity developed. These impacts are likely to include increased reforestation, protection of remaining forests and ecosystems, and sustainable agriculture. For example, improved coordinated knowledge management about the loss of forest cover could help identify ‘hot spots’ to be protected, based on biodiversity information, rate of soil run off, etc. However, it is unlikely that these impacts will be measurable within the timeframe of the project – they will depend on the replication of the project successes nationally, much of which will be after the GEF support has ended.

The project will, however, within its timeframe yield specific global environmental benefits in the five pilot districts. These include (i) decreased deforestation levels; (ii) biodiversity conserved, and (iii) improved land management in the agriculture sector and related impacts on erosion, soil quality and the water cycle. For example, as a result of the project activities in the districts, the District Environmental Management Commissions will have increased knowledge, increased access to resources and information, and better capacity to provide alternative livelihoods. The application of this increased capacity will lead to decreases in deforestation rates. 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: The national level structure and mechanisms for coordinating activities within and across the Rio Conventions are functioning.
    • Output 1.1: The Ghana Environmental Conventions Coordinating Authority (GECCA). The project will first raise awareness and develop a draft Law for this GECCA. It will facilitate consultations amongst concerned international, national and local stakeholders. Government commitment to the GECCA will then be secured. The three existing, but ineffective, Coordinating Committees for the three Conventions will be brought into the GECCA. The Law to establish the GECCA will be appraised and approved in line with national procedures, thereby ensuring its systemization, its permanence and its budget. The Draft Act for the Climate Change Commission (not approved, see Annex 4) will serve as a basis for preparing the GECCA Law.
    • Output 1.2:     A Secretariat to service the GECCA and perform key tasks under the Conventions in a coordinated manner. The Secretariat will be housed in the MLGRDE and will report to the GECCA. It will be well staffed and resourced. The first year operations will be mostly financed by GEF, and henceforth it will be primarily financed by Government. It will be accessible, transparent and accountable.
  • Outcome 2: National agencies responsible for the Rio Conventions are coordinating to perform the following key tasks
    • Output 2.1: Key economic sectors are influenced by the GECCA and Secretariat. With the support of the project, the Secretariat will provide training and technical assistance to sectoral agencies, starting with the agriculture, water, forestry and energy sectors.
    • Output 2.2: A coherent knowledge management system linking the three Conventions.
    • Output 2.3: Strengthened capacity to report to and participate in Conventions. This will include a single reporting system and a single entry/exit point for reports.
    • Output 2.4: Increased financial investment.
    • Output 2.5: Increasing participation of stakeholders in the in-country implementation of the Conventions
  • Outcome 3: Stakeholders in five diverse and representative Districts are piloting the coordination of implementation of the Conventions at the District level.
    • Output 3.1: Five diverse but representative pilot districts are selected.
    • Output 3.2: With the support of the Project, the Secretariat will work with district stakeholders and planners to modify the ongoing district planning process  and ensure the district development plans account for the Rio concerns.
    • Output 3.3: Implementation of pilot activities. These activities were tentatively identified by the local stakeholders in the NCSA process.
  • Outcome 4: Monitoring, Learning, Adaptive feedback & Evaluation
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

  • Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  

End of Project:

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 
Contacts: 
UNDP
Didier Habimana
Country Officer
Government of Ghana
Nicholas Iddi
Project Coordinator
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 

Promoting Climate Resilient Infrastructure in Northern Mountain Provinces of Vietnam

Vietnam is one of the most disaster prone countries in the world. It suffers from typhoons, floods, droughts, landslides, and forest fires. Flooding triggered by typhoons and storms is the most prevalent natural disaster. In the decade up to 2005, storms caused 6,000 deaths, destroyed 320,000 houses and almost 9,000 boats, and resulted in capital stock loss of more than $2.5 billion, representing about 5% of gross annual capital formation.

This UNDP-GEF/SCCF project aims to address these obstacles through four specific outcomes which collectively seek to build long term resilience into the planning, design and implementation for rural infrastructure within the challenging geographic environment of the northern mountain provinces of Vietnam:

  1. Mainstream climate change adaptation into rural infrastructure policy and planning ;
  2. Enhance capacities for climate resilient infrastructure planning in northern mountain provinces;
  3. Support adoption of low cost physical measures to climate proof rural infrastructure; and
  4. Disseminate best practices and lessons learned. 

Source: UNDP Vietnam Project Identification Form (March 20, 2009) and UNDP Project Brief (November 2011).

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (105.845362023 21.0309505867)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Rural and urban citizens in critical economic areas subject to the adverse impacts of climate change, primarily in coastal zones.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
3,400,000 (as of November 2011)
Co-Financing Total: 
148,565,000 (as of January 2013)
Project Details: 

Based on historical averages, 4-6 typhoons currently reach Vietnam each year and batter the eastern seaboard over much of its 3,260-kilometer length. Typhoons cause storm surges and extensive loss of land through wave-induced erosion. The storm surges extend for considerable distances inland, flooding valuable land with salt water and causing loss of life, damage to agricultural production, infrastructure and disruption of livelihoods. The sea dykes constructed over most of the exposed length of coastline are vulnerable to damage by wave action and overtopping; and near-coast infrastructure including bridges, roads, schools, market places, and irrigation works are damaged or out of use during and after typhoons, storm surges and floods.

These problems are expected to worsen in the coming decades with the ever increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere which accelerates climate change. Among the impacts predicted are sea level rise, an increase in the number and intensity of typhoons, and greater variability of rainfall. A recent study on the potential impacts of sea level rise on 84 coastal developing countries shows that a 1-metre rise in sea level would affect approximately 5% of Vietnam’s land area and 11% of the population, adversely impact 7% of agriculture, and reduce GDP by 10%. The government allocated 280 million VND (approximately $15.5 million) in early 2006 for sea dyke upgrades in localities often hit by storms and floods. This amount would marginally improve resilience to climate change impacts but is a concrete recognition of the urgency of the need to adapt.

Broad coastal zone policy has been developed in Vietnam and capacities of several provinces have been enhanced in terms of integrated coastal zone management. However, the effects of climate change have not been fully integrated into these efforts, and awareness of the likely impacts of climate change among policy makers, local planners and communities remains limited. National and local regulation regarding zoning, spatial planning and construction standards do not yet reflect the changing reality of increased typhoon activity and related storm surges, sea level rise, and enhanced drought in the central coastal zone.

The GEF/SCCF project aims to address these obstacles through the mainstreaming of climate risk reduction into policy formulation and coastal zone management as well as associated infrastructure development planning; capacity development to increase understanding of current and emerging climate risks and promote resilient decisions at central and local planning levels; and the demonstration of ways to effectively 'climate-proof' coastal area infrastructure with a view to systematically develop and apply climate resilient building codes and standards.

A central element of the project is to examine climate change related risks with local communities and officials, and to make the experiences gained from the climate-proofing of critical coastal area infrastructure work for vulnerability reduction at all levels, using entry points of policy and regulatory revisions as well as climate-resilient development planning. It does this in the context of substantial baseline efforts in policy development, coastal infrastructure development, and capacity building efforts of UNDP and ADB in Vietnam, which jointly make up a coherent program to address climate change.

The Government's 5-year socioeconomic development plan (SEDP) for 2006-2010 has a strong results orientation with performance indicators and gives priority to disaster-stricken regions in recognition of the link between vulnerability to natural disasters and persistent poverty. Reducing vulnerability is to be achieved by (among others) preventing and mitigating natural disasters. Embedded in its disaster risk management strategy is the concept of including measures to prevent and minimize the effects of natural calamities as a regular part of development programs and projects.

The Government of Vietnam is currently finalizing the National Target Program to Address Climate Change and Sea Level Rise (NTP), which outlines, among others, strategies to adapt to climate change impacts. The NTP calls for numerous responses to climate change, including  three points that the proposed project is directly aligned to support: (i) development and implementation of pilot projects to respond to climate change; (ii) strengthening the capacity of organizations and policies for climate change and specifically sea level rise; and (iii) international cooperation to implement the program.

The Government's approaches to disaster response, so far, focus on warning and structural measures. This is also expressed by the emphasis on infrastructure focus among the adaptation measures identified in Vietnam's initial national communication under the UNFCCC, which enumerated the following strategies in the coastal zone:  

  • Full protection: implemented all-sided protection measures to maintain present situation, effectively respond to sea level rise. This option requires to make all dykes higher and to strengthen coastal management. To prevent salinity intrusion, pumping for drainage and making land foundation higher would be very necessary.
  • Adaptation: reform infrastructures and habits of people living in the coastal zone to adapt to sea level rise. To accept some losses, paying special attention to build "adaptive" infrastructures and transfer to suitable farming techniques.
  • Withdrawal (also called "avoidance"): avoid natural impacts of sea level rise by resettlement, moving houses, and infrastructure from threatened areas. This option would also include natural mitigation from inundation area inland.  

Provinces are improving various coastal infrastructure as per the second element listed above, though not necessarily cognizant of additional risks and design needs that result from changing climatic conditions. This infrastructure construction happens partly with international official development assistance (ODA), including an ADB/ADF loan for upgrading infrastructure quality and availability in the coastal zone of central provinces. The proposed GEF/SCCF financing project intends to directly support such efforts, adding attention to climate proofing selected and representative infrastructure according to internationally developed methodologies, and building capacities for such planning and action in the pilot provinces where this happens as well as the central level. The project will also help translate lessons learned into adjustments to national and local strategies and regulations, especially regarding location and construction standards of selected types of small scale coastal infrastructure.

Source: UNDP Vietnam Project Identification Form (March 20, 2009)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Climate Change Adaptation integrated into coastal zone management policies, plans and regulations
    • Output 1.1: Documented review of existing coastal zone development policies and provincial plans for their vulnerability and resilience effects to  projected climate change risk
    • Output 1.2: Updated coastal zone management and development policies to promote increased resilience of critical infrastructure in vulnerable coastal areas
    • Output 1.3: Development and approval of regulations to ensure that climate risk projections are included in the formulation of infrastructure zoning, design and construction
  • Outcome 2: Enhanced capacity to understand emerging climate hazards and address them through strategic risk reduction measures at the sectoral and local planning levels
    • Output 2.1: Enhanced technical capacity to integrate climate scenario information into coastal development planning with key sectoral ministries
    • Output 2.2: Awareness of climate change impacts in affected coastal communities enhanced and potential adaptation options for increased resilience of vulnerable small to medium sized infrastructure promoted
    • Output 2.3: Regular dialogue established between policy-makers and communities on the impacts of climate change on critical infrastructure in vulnerable coastal areas 
  • Outcome 3: Demonstrated and developed lessons learned from climate proofing of selected coastal area infrastructure
    • Output 3.1: Design of existing standards for coastal area infrastructure examined against different levels of vulnerability and risks
    • Output 3.2: Demonstration activities on the costs and benefits of climate proofing the most vulnerable coastal area infrastructure
    • Output 3.3: Selected coastal area infrastructure  - including rural roads, small-scale water supply and sanitation, irrigation schemes, and coastal protection measures climate-proofed for demonstration and replication purposes
    • Output 3.4: Codes and best practice manual in climate proofing of coastal area infrastructure developed and disseminated
  • Outcome 4: Experiences generated contribute to the Adaptation Learning Mechanism (ALM)
    • Output 4.1: Project lessons captured, classified and evaluated
    • Output 4.2: Adaptation knowledge and experiences from the project documented and disseminated within Vietnam, in the Asian region and beyond

Source: UNDP Vietnam Project Identification Form (March 20, 2009)

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits: 

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:  

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project's results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

Establish a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: UNDP Vietnam Project Identification Form (March 20, 2009)

 
Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Bui Viet Hien
Country Officer
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
sccf
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Philippines NAMA

Under the Low Emission Capacity Building (LECB) Programme, financed by the EU, Germany, and AusAID, participating countries are primarily focusing on capacity building activities at the national level.  This includes formulating Low-Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) and/or Nationally appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs), as well as establishing the underlying data collection systems (i.e. national GHG inventory systems, and monitoring, reporting and verification systems).

Nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) are concrete projects, policies, and/or programmes that shift a technology or sector in a country onto a low-carbon development trajectory.  A LEDS, on the other hand, outlines the intended overall economic, energy, and emissions trajectory for a country and helps to identify entry points for policy intervention (including identifying and prioritizing NAMAs and ensuring coherence between NAMAs and national development goals).

Under the Programme, the Philippines will fully operationalise its newly developed GHG inventory management system as a platform to identify NAMAs, design LEDS, and MRV mitigation actions. The focus under the Programme will be on building capacities in the transport, waste management, and agriculture sectors.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (120.893557742 15.4649600982)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
The four-year Low Emission Capacity Building Programme is being implemented with €8,000,000 of funding from the European Union and €5,000,000 from the Federal Republic of Germany.
Project Details: 

Supporting Mitigation Actions

As a country driven process, each country determines, develops and executes its own project with a clear focus on one of the two areas. From the inception phase of each project, however, and for the life of the project, countries will receive guidance and support from UNDP. Guidance and technical backstopping for all national-level projects will be coordinated, delivered and supported through an over-arching component of the programme: the Global Support Unit.

Programme-supported projects fall into one of several categories:

  • Identifying opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) and designing low emission development strategies (LEDS) in context of national priorities
  • Design ofsystems for measuring, reporting, and verification (MRV) of proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions
  • Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems
  • Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries in some countries
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme promotes essential cooperation between relevant institutions, engaging the public sector and industry in a concerted effort to address climate change consistent with national development priorities around the world.

The overall objectives are to strengthen capacities in participating countries in the following ways:

  • Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems;
  • Identify opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMA);
  • Design low emission development strategies (LEDS) in the context of national priorities
  • Design systems for measuring, reporting, and verification of proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions
  • Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries in some countries
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) should be an essential component of any LEDS, NAMAs, or Mitigation Action Plans (MAPs) prepared by developing countries – particularly if a developing country is seeking external financial, technical or capacity-building support, and will therefore be subject to international MRV as described in the Cancun Accords. However, MRV needs will differ depending on whether a country is undertaking a REDD+ type NAMA, for example, versus improving an urban mass transit system. (It is worth noting that the international political arena also refers to the MRV of public finance; this is not being addressed under this project.)

Methodological approach

New methodologies are being developed by different organizations for the development and adoption of MRVs. Although there are still no adopted guidelines on MRV, we can assume that there will be some overarching principles of good practice, such as using the GHG estimation and reporting processes described in the IPCC guidance materials for GHG inventories.

Institutional and political context

As with the GHG national inventory system, it will be important to raise awareness of all key stakeholders on the necessity for MRV to ensure full engagement. It may be useful to consider developing a strategy to engage key providers of data and ensure they are adequately trained.

Linkages to other relevant initiatives

Clearly, the work undertaken under this component has a direct linkage to the National Communications process. Some countries may also be undertaking GHG inventories at the sub-national level and will need to consider how to incorporate this work, as appropriate. Indicators being used in mitigation projects financed by the GEF or other sources may also provide insights for the MRV strategy for NAMAs, LEDS, and/or MAPs.

Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
bf
Project Status: 

Egypt NAMA

Under the Low Emission Capacity Building (LECB) Programme, financed by the EU, Germany, and AusAID, participating countries are primarily focusing on capacity building activities at the national level.  This includes formulating Low-Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) and/or Nationally appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs), as well as establishing the underlying data collection systems (i.e. national GHG inventory systems, and monitoring, reporting and verification systems).

Nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) are concrete projects, policies, and/or programmes that shift a technology or sector in a country onto a low-carbon development trajectory.  A LEDS, on the other hand, outlines the intended overall economic, energy, and emissions trajectory for a country and helps to identify entry points for policy intervention (including identifying and prioritizing NAMAs and ensuring coherence between NAMAs and national development goals).

In Egypt, the government will work with the iron and steel and/or cement industries to build capacities to develop and implement mitigation action plans. Under the Programme, the government also plans to design and adopt a national GHG inventory system (in collaboration with 3rd National Communication), design LEDS, and develop up to 20 NAMAs in the energy and transport sectors.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (29.663092046 29.0856087988)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
The four-year Low Emission Capacity Building Programme is being implemented with €8,000,000 of funding from the European Union and €5,000,000 from the Federal Republic of Germany.
Project Details: 

Supporting Mitigation Actions

As a country driven process, each country determines, develops and executes its own project with a clear focus on one of the two areas. From the inception phase of each project, however, and for the life of the project, countries will receive guidance and support from UNDP. Guidance and technical backstopping for all national-level projects will be coordinated, delivered and supported through an over-arching component of the programme: the Global Support Unit.

Programme-supported projects fall into one of several categories:

  • Identifying opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) and designing low emission development strategies (LEDS) in context of national priorities
  • Design ofsystems for measuring, reporting, and verification (MRV) of proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions
  • Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems
  • Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries in some countries
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme promotes essential cooperation between relevant institutions, engaging the public sector and industry in a concerted effort to address climate change consistent with national development priorities around the world.

The overall objectives are to strengthen capacities in participating countries in the following ways:

  • Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems;
  • Identify opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMA);
  • Design low emission development strategies (LEDS) in the context of national priorities
  • Design systems for measuring, reporting, and verification of proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions
  • Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries in some countries
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) should be an essential component of any LEDS, NAMAs, or Mitigation Action Plans (MAPs) prepared by developing countries – particularly if a developing country is seeking external financial, technical or capacity-building support, and will therefore be subject to international MRV as described in the Cancun Accords. However, MRV needs will differ depending on whether a country is undertaking a REDD+ type NAMA, for example, versus improving an urban mass transit system. (It is worth noting that the international political arena also refers to the MRV of public finance; this is not being addressed under this project.)

Methodological approach

New methodologies are being developed by different organizations for the development and adoption of MRVs. Although there are still no adopted guidelines on MRV, we can assume that there will be some overarching principles of good practice, such as using the GHG estimation and reporting processes described in the IPCC guidance materials for GHG inventories.

Institutional and political context

As with the GHG national inventory system, it will be important to raise awareness of all key stakeholders on the necessity for MRV to ensure full engagement. It may be useful to consider developing a strategy to engage key providers of data and ensure they are adequately trained.

Linkages to other relevant initiatives

Clearly, the work undertaken under this component has a direct linkage to the National Communications process. Some countries may also be undertaking GHG inventories at the sub-national level and will need to consider how to incorporate this work, as appropriate. Indicators being used in mitigation projects financed by the GEF or other sources may also provide insights for the MRV strategy for NAMAs, LEDS, and/or MAPs.

Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
bf
Project Status: 

Kenya NAMA

Under the Low Emission Capacity Building (LECB) Programme, financed by the EU, Germany, and AusAID, participating countries are primarily focusing on capacity building activities at the national level.  This includes formulating Low-Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) and/or Nationally appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs), as well as establishing the underlying data collection systems (i.e. national GHG inventory systems, and monitoring, reporting and verification systems).

Nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) are concrete projects, policies, and/or programmes that shift a technology or sector in a country onto a low-carbon development trajectory.  A LEDS, on the other hand, outlines the intended overall economic, energy, and emissions trajectory for a country and helps to identify entry points for policy intervention (including identifying and prioritizing NAMAs and ensuring coherence between NAMAs and national development goals).

In Kenya national stakeholders will work to build a policy and regulatory environment, investigate financing options, and improve knowledge sharing. Additionally, the government has identified the development of a GHG national inventory system as the highest priority under the Programme, since this will provide the foundation for identifying NAMAs and supporting MRV actions.
A transport NAMA for reducing vehicle emissions will be fast-tracked to gain experience and capacity for investigating NAMAs in the energy (household demand/biomass use) and industrial (energy demand) sub-sectors.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (38.562014773022 0.97259894384475)
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
The four-year Low Emission Capacity Building Programme is being implemented with €8,000,000 of funding from the European Union and €5,000,000 from the Federal Republic of Germany.
Project Details: 

Supporting Mitigation Actions

As a country driven process, each country determines, develops and executes its own project with a clear focus on one of the two areas. From the inception phase of each project, however, and for the life of the project, countries will receive guidance and support from UNDP. Guidance and technical backstopping for all national-level projects will be coordinated, delivered and supported through an over-arching component of the programme: the Global Support Unit.

Programme-supported projects fall into one of several categories:

  • Identifying opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) and designing low emission development strategies (LEDS) in context of national priorities
  • Design ofsystems for measuring, reporting, and verification (MRV) of proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions
  • Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems
  • Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries in some countries
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme promotes essential cooperation between relevant institutions, engaging the public sector and industry in a concerted effort to address climate change consistent with national development priorities around the world.

The overall objectives are to strengthen capacities in participating countries in the following ways:

  • Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems;
  • Identify opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMA);
  • Design low emission development strategies (LEDS) in the context of national priorities
  • Design systems for measuring, reporting, and verification of proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions
  • Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries in some countries
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) should be an essential component of any LEDS, NAMAs, or Mitigation Action Plans (MAPs) prepared by developing countries – particularly if a developing country is seeking external financial, technical or capacity-building support, and will therefore be subject to international MRV as described in the Cancun Accords. However, MRV needs will differ depending on whether a country is undertaking a REDD+ type NAMA, for example, versus improving an urban mass transit system. (It is worth noting that the international political arena also refers to the MRV of public finance; this is not being addressed under this project.)

Methodological approach

New methodologies are being developed by different organizations for the development and adoption of MRVs. Although there are still no adopted guidelines on MRV, we can assume that there will be some overarching principles of good practice, such as using the GHG estimation and reporting processes described in the IPCC guidance materials for GHG inventories.

Institutional and political context

As with the GHG national inventory system, it will be important to raise awareness of all key stakeholders on the necessity for MRV to ensure full engagement. It may be useful to consider developing a strategy to engage key providers of data and ensure they are adequately trained.

Linkages to other relevant initiatives

Clearly, the work undertaken under this component has a direct linkage to the National Communications process. Some countries may also be undertaking GHG inventories at the sub-national level and will need to consider how to incorporate this work, as appropriate. Indicators being used in mitigation projects financed by the GEF or other sources may also provide insights for the MRV strategy for NAMAs, LEDS, and/or MAPs.

Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
bf
Project Status: