Decentralized Cooperation

Taxonomy Term List

Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA) AFRICA

In order for governments to fully incorporate climate change adaptation considerations into national and local socio-economic development projects and plans, they need tools and trained professionals to undertake economic analyses of proposed adaptation activities. As part of the global Capacity Building Programme on the Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Global Water Partnership, and the Centre for Environmental Economics and Policy in Africa (CEEPA) of the University of Pretoria have developed a two-year capacity-building regional program entitled “Economics of Climate Change Adaptation, water security and climate resilient development” in Africa.

ECCA Africa work is aligned with the on-going initiatives of countries in Africa who are engaging in the process of developing medium and long-term adaptation plans such as National Adaptation Plans (NAPs). NAPs are underway in preparation for the operationalization of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and the emerging architecture on climate finance. 

Visit the Capacity Building Programme on the Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA) profile for overall information on the global programme. For additional regional and country-level work visit the ECCA Asia and ECCA Pacific profiles.

Location:
Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Liberia, Rwanda, Tunisia, Zimbabwe, Zambia.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (38.7598 8.99903)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The programme aims to produce a cadre of technical officers in each country who are able to conduct economic analyses of climate change adaptation and to feed those analyses into planning and budgeting processes. The programme will seek to strengthen existing systems of sector level planning and budgeting to incorporate key results from the economics of adaptation so that decisions can be evidence-based.
Funding Source: 
About: 

The objective of the ECCA Africa work is to strengthen the capacity of technical officers in Ministries of Planning/Finance as well as in Ministries in charge of Environment, Agriculture, Water, Public Works, lands and others, to understand the economics of adaptation as it relates to medium- and long-term national, sub-national and sectorial development planning as well as in evaluating different adaptation investment projects. This capacity building program for Africa government officials and researchers will produce a cadre of practitioners who can prepare high-quality economic analyses related to climate change adaptation projects and programs. In coordination with other on-going and planned UNDP initiatives, the program is also expected to strengthen governments’ capacity to more fully integrate climate change adaptation into national, sub-national and sector planning and budgeting. It will be delivered as a series of training and experience-sharing workshops interspersed with field work and application.

Specifically, the approach that will be adopted in this capacity building programme is based on the following key elements:

  • Training of technical officers at the national and sub-national level to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts as well as adaptation options and to apply specific methods and analytical frameworks to prioritize local climate change adaptation requirements;
  • Establishment of  a national-based training programme that is housed within a suitable centre of excellence in the country that can provide continuous technical advisory support on the economics of adaptation to countries developing national adaptation plans and investment projects
  • Provide tailored support and guidance to technical officers at the national/sub-national level, including others, through internationally recognized experts from the continent, to assess the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options in order to promote learning by doing
  • Convene policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries at the country and regional level (agriculture, land and mines, maritime affairs, water resources) to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development plans and investment projects
  • Develop and nurture a virtual community of practice of technical officers working on the economics of adaptation in Africa.
  • Support the appraisal of investment projects for adaptation that can be financed from current and emerging sources of climate finance.

This programme is aligned with the on-going initiatives of countries in the Africa region that are engaging in the process of developing medium and long-term adaptation plans such as National Adaptation Plans (NAPs). NAPs are underway in preparation for the operationalization of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and the emerging architecture on climate finance.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Principal Activities
In coordination with GEF LDCF projects, NAP development process and other UNDP initiatives, the program is expected to strengthen governments capacities to more fully integrate climate change adaptation into national, sub-national, and sector planning and budgeting. Africa experts in development planning and from the financial and environmental sectors will benefit in various ways throughout the two-year training program. The principal activities will include:

Regional Activities
The program has been launched with a consultation between countries, involving UNDP, CEEPA and GWPheld from the 25 to the 29  Novembre 2013 in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) . This regional consultation has been attended by government officials from 17 countries in Africa, as well as representatives of international organizations and academia – in association with UNDP, GWP and (CEEPA) of the University of Pretoria. The consultation will be followed by a first regional training workshop that will be held in February 2014. Participants will consider the methods and data used to analyze the economic benefits of undertaking proposed climate change adaptation projects in the agriculture, water and coastal management sectors. They will also consider the economic analyses for adaptation interventions at sectoral level to inform medium and long-term climate investment planning. The workshop will provide hands-on practical exercises, through the analysis of real case studies selected by each “country team”.

National and sub-national Activities
Following the workshop, the participants of the regional workshop will develop and implement a national-based training program for national and sub-national experts. This training program will be completed by in-country field activities to assess the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options in order to promote learning by doing. Mentors will be assigned to support country teams. The participants will regroup the next year at a second training workshop to share their initial results and to receive additional training before continuing their field work.

Knowledge Management and sharing
To ensure relevant information and knowledge that has been generated is appropriately documented, codified and disseminated in ways practitioners and decision-makers can make use of, the program will also integrate a knowledge management component. This component will be implemented through 3 mechanisms:

  • Promoting sharing platforms, such as economics of climate change adaptation, existing in electronic or traditional platforms from the program partners and other institutions for knowledge sharing;
  • Promoting the generation of content by documenting key results, knowledge and lessons drawn from the in-country field activities, codifying them for easier access and use in policy planning and disseminating them through appropriate channels including publications, national and regional workshops and high-level decision makers meetings;
  • Providing technical assistance in response to specific information and knowledge needs that may arise in the implementation of national programmes.
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

More information to come...

Contacts: 
Centre for Environmental Economics & Policy in Africa (CEEPA)
Babatunde Abidoye
UNDP
Henry Rene Diouf
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Pacific Cost-Benefit Analysis Initiative (P-CBA)

The Pacific branch of the Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA) work is the Pacific Cost-Benefit Analysis Initiative (P-CBA). P-CBA is a joint initiative to address the increasing needs of Pacific island countries to access tools that can support their climate-resilient decisions and adaptation strategies. This increasing need has been recently highlighted at the Pacific Climate Change Roundtable in July 2013 where many officials in Pacific island governments recognized the value of economic analysis to assess options and shape and their work.  Partners include the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat (PIFS), the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), UNDP, Deutsche Gesellshaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), the USAID ADAPT Asia-Pacific Project and the University of the South Pacific (USP).

The P-CBA initiative builds on existing experiences such as the cost-benefit analyses conducted as part of the UNDP Pacific Adaptation to Climate Change programme and the related trainings carried out by SPC and SPREP, to capture lessons learned and to strengthen capacities in a consistent and strategic manner.

This regional initiative targets government officials from Central planning or Finance ministries that are involved in project management and climate resilient development activities. P-CBA has a learning-by-doing approach: theoretical trainings will be followed by the mentoring of government officials to conduct cost-benefit analysis on project proposal(s) or on-going initiatives. The results of these analyses will serve as concrete support to government activities providing guidance on project formulation and implementation.  The initiative will be carried out over a period of 20 months and it is divided in 5 phases expected to end in December 2015:

  1. Planning Meeting: Government officials will shape the overall initiative based on countries needs and existing capacities;
  2. In-country trainings: Multilevel trainings, tailored to different government roles and country needs
  3. Mentoring support: Countries will be supported by a specialist to design a cost-benefit analysis of an on-going initiative;
  4. Integrate CBA in government processes: internal sustainability measures to integrate CBA into project appraisal and budgetary planning;
  5. Facilitate knowledge and lessons learnt sharing: final event to facilitate sharing of lessons learnt and establishment of a regional CBA database.

USP has a critical role in the design and delivery of the courses, and will ensure long term sustainability of the initiative by incorporating the courses into their graduate modules and summer courses for continued learning.

P-CBA together with its respective initiatives in Africa and Asia aims to mainstream in governments the use of solid economic analysis to integrate climate risk in development strategies. This process is part of the UNDP in support of the formulation National Adaptation Plans (NAPs), a process established under the Cancun Adaptation Framework (CAF) to help countries identify their medium- and long-term adaptation needs.

Location:
Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Kiribati, Samoa, Fiji and Federate States of Micronesia. 

Visit the Capacity Building Programme on the Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA) profile for overall information on the global programme. For additional regional and country-level work visit the ECCA Africa and ECCA Asia profiles.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (178.445 -18.1364)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The programme aims to produce a cadre of technical officers in each country who are able to conduct economic analyses of climate change adaptation and to feed those analyses into planning and budgeting processes. The programme will seek to strengthen existing systems of sector level planning and budgeting to incorporate key results from the economics of adaptation so that decisions can be evidence-based.
Funding Source: 
News article
Assessments and Background Documents
Knowledge Products
Programme Related Events
Training & Tools
Examples of Cost- Benefit Analysis Reports
About: 

For the Pacific, two streams of work with Pacific island countries (PIC) governments are envisaged:

  1. Stream 1 – capacity enhancement in CBA at project level: Formal training, (USP), in-country training (potentially with PICPA), learning-by-doing (post workshop mentoring in CBA), communication of results for effective decision making; and 
  2. Stream 2 – sectoral assessments for adaptation: Identification of sectors impacted by CC, in-country training in economic assessment and work-planning, learning by doing (assessing the economic impact of climate change and risks), communication of results to inform decision-making, tertiary training courses in economic assessment of CC assessment.

The overall ECCA programme is designed and rolled out as a complement to UNDP's support to countries on adaptation with financing from the Least Developed Country Fund, Special Climate Change Fund (managed by the Global Environment Facility) and the Adaptation Fund.  It is aligned with upcoming UNDP-UNEP-GEF support to countries that are preparing to formulate National Adaptation Plans.

Specifically, the approach adopted in this capacity building programme is based on the following key elements:

  • Training of technical officers at the national and sub-national level to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts as well as adaptation options  
  • Support technical officers at the national/sub-national level, including others, to assess the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options in order to promote learning by doing
  • Establishment of  the training programme within a suitable center of excellence in the country or region that can provide continuous technical advisory support on the economics of adaptation to countries developing national adaptation plans and investment projects
  • Convene policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries at the country and regional level to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development plans and investment projects
  • Develop and nurture a virtual community of practice of technical officers working on the economics of adaptation
  • Support the appraisal of investment projects for adaptation that can be financed from current and emerging sources of climate finance

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Intended Outcomes for the Pacific:

  1. Building capacities of governments to conduct and use cost benefit analysis to inform Government decision-making;
     
  2. Practice of cost-benefit analysis on a Government activity, policy or sector plan;
     
  3. Adoption of organizational/institutional measures to ensure the ongoing development of cost-benefit analysis capabilities and their practice in budgetary processes and appraisal of projects and policies.

 

For the overall ECCA work:

  • Technical officers in Planning, Finance, Environment, Agriculture, Water and Public Works Ministries and others at the national and sub-national level trained to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts as well as adaptation options  
  • Country Teams (comprised of technical officers from relevant Government Ministries, academia and others) conduct assessments on the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options (this work will be linked to ongoing adaptation projects financed by the Least Developed Country Fund, Special Climate Change Fund and/or Adaptation Fund)
  • Investment projects for adaptation that can be financed from current and emerging sources of funds such as the Green Climate Fund will be assessed in terms of their economic costs and benefits
  • Establishment of  the training programme within a suitable learning center in the country or region that can provide continuous technical advisory support to countries on the assessing the economic costs/benefits of adaptation
  • Regular policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries conducted at the country and regional level to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development planning process.
  • A virtual community of practice working on the economics of adaptation in will be established, with innovative means to share lessons and knowledge, including Live Chats and Webinars- virtual classroom settings where participants discuss issues with the lead mentors as well as each other.  The Global ALM platform will avail facilities for the community of practice to share learning materials as well as lessons learned. 
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The P-CBA initiative has two M&E frameworks that differ in terms of scope of the analysis:

  1. Regional M&E framework - It tracks the progresses and  outputs of the initiative at the regional level (See Table 1 Below).
     
  2. National M&E frameworks - Each participant country has developed their own M&E framework to track progresses and outputs at the national level (See Country Workplans).

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Gabor Vereczi
UNDP
Marco Arena
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

Pacific Programme Related Events

 
 

 

Map Caption: 

The P-CBA initiative is working in Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Kiribati, Samoa, Fiji and Federated States of Micronesia.

Capacity Building Programme on the Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA)

ECCA Africa        ECCA Asia       ECCA Pacific (P-CBA)  

The objective of this programme is to strengthen the capacity of technical officers in Ministries of Planning/Finance, as well as line Ministries (Environment, Agriculture, Water, Public Works, and others) to assess economic costs and benefits when evaluating different adaptation alternatives, as they relate to medium- and long-term national, sub-national and sectoral development plans.

This capacity building programme for government officials will produce a cadre of practitioners who can prepare high-quality economic analyses related to climate change adaptation projects and programmes. In coordination with other ongoing and planned UNDP initiatives, the programme is also expected to strengthen governments’ capacity to more fully integrate climate change adaptation into national, sub-national and sector planning and budgeting. 

Ultimately, the programme seeks to institutionalize these important analytical skills into ministries and departments, enabling countries to formulate economically efficient and climate resilient development plans, including National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) - a process established under the Cancun Adaptation Framework (CAF) to help countries identify their medium- and long-term adaptation needs. 

For more information on regional and country-level work visit the ECCA Africa, ECCA Asia, and ECCA Pacific profiles.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The programme aims to produce a cadre of technical officers in each country who are able to conduct economic analyses of climate change adaptation and to feed those analyses into planning and budgeting processes. The programme will seek to strengthen existing systems of sector level planning and budgeting to incorporate key results from the economics of adaptation so that decisions can be evidence-based.
Funding Source: 
Highlights
Assessments and Background Documents
Document
Training & Tools
Examples of Cost- Benefit Analysis Reports
Relevant Peer-Reviewed Articles
Reports and Publications of relevance to Country Teams
About: 

The programme is designed and rolled out as a compliment to UNDP's support to countries on adaptation with financing from the Least Developed Country Fund, Special Climate Change Fund (managed by the Global Environment Facility) and the Adaptation Fund.  It is aligned with upcoming UNDP-UNEP-GEF support to countries that are preparing to formulate National Adaptation Plans.

Specifically, the approach adopted in this capacity building programme is based on the following key elements:

  • Training of technical officers at the national and sub-national level to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts as well as adaptation options  
  • Support technical officers at the national/sub-national level, including others, to assess the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options in order to promote learning by doing
  • Establishment of  the training programme within a suitable center of excellence in the country or region that can provide continuous technical advisory support on the economics of adaptation to countries developing national adaptation plans and investment projects
  • Convene policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries at the country and regional level to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development plans and investment projects
  • Develop and nurture a virtual community of practice of technical officers working on the economics of adaptation
  • Support the appraisal of investment projects for adaptation that can be financed from current and emerging sources of climate finance
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Technical officers in Planning, Finance, Environment, Agriculture, Water and Public Works Ministries and others at the national and sub-national level trained to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts as well as adaptation options  
  • Country Teams (comprised of technical officers from relevant Government Ministries, academia and others) conduct assessments on the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options (this work will be linked to ongoing adaptation projects financed by the Least Developed Country Fund, Special Climate Change Fund and/or Adaptation Fund)
  • Investment projects for adaptation that can be financed from current and emerging sources of funds such as the Green Climate Fund will be assessed in terms of their economic costs and benefits
  • Establishment of  the training programme within a suitable learning center in the country or region that can provide continuous technical advisory support to countries on the assessing the economic costs/benefits of adaptation
  • Regular policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries conducted at the country and regional level to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development planning process.
  • A virtual community of practice working on the economics of adaptation in will be established, with innovative means to share lessons and knowledge, including Live Chats and Webinars- virtual classroom settings where participants discuss issues with the lead mentors as well as each other.  The Global ALM platform will avail facilities for the community of practice to share learning materials as well as lessons learned. 
Contacts: 
UNDP/ USAID ADAPT Asia-Pacific
Mariana Simoes
UNDP
Jaturong Padungsapya
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
USAID ADAPT Asia-Pacific
Robert Dobias
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA) ASIA

The Capacity Building Programme on the Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA) in Asia is a cooperative effort between UNDP, the USAID ADAPT Asia-Pacific Project, the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Global Water Partnership (GWP) and Yale University.  It addresses a consensus reached during a 2012 Regional Consultation that a more comprehensive approach to mainstreaming climate change risks into planning processes was needed to ensure economically-efficient climate change strategies at the sectoral, sub-national and national levels.

The ECCA programme is thus comprised of a series of trainings on microeconomic tools for assessing the costs and benefits of adaptation.  Trainings are interspersed with in-country work with the mentor support of an economics expert from a local university.  The programme targets technical staff in the public sector, specifically those who are or will be involved in sector or project analysis in central agencies including Planning, Finance, Environment and/or line Ministries.  Many of the targeted staff are also expected to play key roles in mainstreaming climate into development planning, as Least Developing Countries are shortly expected to do through their respective National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process. 

The 1st and 2nd regional workshops provided training on theory and the practical application of cost-benefit analysis, and introduced participants to forecasting and modeling.  The 3rd and 4th trainings next year will move from project level analysis to sectoral analysis, and will look into country-specific institutional development plans, within the context of ongoing and new initiatives.  These analyses will be further presented to policy makers, and can support decision-making related to the assessment of alternative adaptation options.

Ultimately, the programme seeks to institutionalize these important analytical skills into ministries and departments, enabling countries to formulate economically efficient and climate resilient development plans, including National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) - a process established under the Cancun Adaptation Framework (CAF) to help countries identify their medium- and long-term adaptation needs.  These trainings will be shaped into a post-graduate training course, available at universities and institutions in Asia region for continued learning. 

Visit the Capacity Building Programme on the Economics of Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA) profile for overall information on the global programme. For additional regional and country-level work visit the ECCA Africa and ECCA Pacific profiles. 

Workshops, Live Chats & Webinars

This is a two-year programme with four regional workshops, each workshop is a building block guiding participants through principles and application techniques of economic analysis. These trainings and experience-sharing workshops are interspersed with field work and application.  Additional support is provided to the country teams through Live Chats and Webinars- virtual classroom settings where participants discuss issues with the lead mentors as well as each other.

Location:
Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Viet Nam

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (100.480950923 13.748793978)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The programme aims to produce a cadre of technical officers in each country who are able to conduct economic analyses of climate change adaptation and to feed those analyses into planning and budgeting processes. The programme will seek to strengthen existing systems of sector level planning and budgeting to incorporate key results from the economics of adaptation so that decisions can be evidence-based.
Funding Source: 
About: 

The programme is designed and rolled out as a complement to UNDP's support to countries on adaptation with financing from the Least Developed Country Fund, Special Climate Change Fund (managed by the Global Environment Facility) and the Adaptation Fund.  It is aligned with upcoming UNDP-UNEP-GEF support to countries that are preparing to formulate National Adaptation Plans.

Specifically, the approach adopted in this capacity building programme is based on the following key elements:

  • Training of technical officers at the national and sub-national level to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts as well as adaptation options  
  • Support technical officers at the national/sub-national level, including others, to assess the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options in order to promote learning by doing
  • Establishment of  the training programme within a suitable center of excellence in the country or region that can provide continuous technical advisory support on the economics of adaptation to countries developing national adaptation plans and investment projects
  • Convene policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries at the country and regional level to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development plans and investment projects
  • Develop and nurture a virtual community of practice of technical officers working on the economics of adaptation
  • Support the appraisal of investment projects for adaptation that can be financed from current and emerging sources of climate finance
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Technical officers in Planning, Finance, Environment, Agriculture, Water and Public Works Ministries and others at the national and sub-national level trained to estimate the economic costs and benefits of climate change impacts as well as adaptation options  
  • Country Teams (comprised of technical officers from relevant Government Ministries, academia and others) conduct assessments on the costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options (this work will be linked to ongoing adaptation projects financed by the Least Developed Country Fund, Special Climate Change Fund and/or Adaptation Fund)
  • Investment projects for adaptation that can be financed from current and emerging sources of funds such as the Green Climate Fund will be assessed in terms of their economic costs and benefits
  • Establishment of  the training programme within a suitable learning center in the country or region that can provide continuous technical advisory support to countries on the assessing the economic costs/benefits of adaptation
  • Regular policy dialogue forums with Ministries of Planning/Finance and line Ministries conducted at the country and regional level to discuss the economics of adaptation in the context of national and sub-national medium and long-term national development planning process.
  • A virtual community of practice working on the economics of adaptation in will be established, with innovative means to share lessons and knowledge, including Live Chats and Webinars- virtual classroom settings where participants discuss issues with the lead mentors as well as each other.  The Global ALM platform will avail facilities for the community of practice to share learning materials as well as lessons learned. 

 

Contacts: 
UNDP/ USAID ADAPT Asia-Pacific
Mariana Simoes
UNDP
Jaturong Padungsapya
UNDP
Pradeep Kurukulasuriya
USAID ADAPT Asia-Pacific
Robert Dobias
Project Status: 

Low Emission Capacity Building Programme

Envisioned as a country-driven initiative, the Low Emission Capacity Building (LECB) Programme works with partner governments to implement national projects that support sustainable mitigation actions in both the public and industrial sectors. The five-year, $28M Programme was launched in 2011. With initial  contributions from the European Commission and the Federal Republic of Germany, the programme’s overall objectives are to strengthen capacities in participating countries in the following ways:

  • ƒƒ Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems;
  • ƒƒ Elaborate opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs);
  • ƒƒ Design low emission development strategies (LEDS) in the context of national priorities;
  • ƒƒ Design systems for measuring, reporting, and verifying proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions;
  • ƒƒ Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries (in some countries)

The overall objectives of the programme are to strengthen the capacity of developing countries to monitor, report and verify greenhouse gas emissions; to identify opportunities for Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the context of national development; and to support the design of low-emission development strategies (LEDS) and to facilitate the uptake of mitigation actions by selected sectors, with the participation of the private sector, as appropriate, taking into account national priorities and circumstances and national economic plans.

Consultations for these public sector activities are currently taking place with Chile, Colombia, DRC, Ecuador, Egypt, Kenya, Morocco, Peru, the Philippines, Uganda, and Zambia. The programme also includes activities to build private sector capacity to uptake mitigation actions, for which Brazil, China, Egypt, Mexico and South Africa are currently being consulted.

 

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$17,082,786
About: 

The Low Emission Capacity Building Programme is working in 25 countries globally. Following a generous contribution from the Australian Government, as well as an additional charitable contribution from the European Commission, the Low Emission Capacity Building Programme has expanded its scope to include:  Bhutan, Costa Rica, Ghana, Indonesia, Lebanon, Malaysia, Moldova, Tanzania, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, and Vietnam. Already active in 14 countries globally (Argentina, China, Chile, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ecuador, Egypt, Kenya, Philippines, Mexico, Morocco, Peru, Uganda and  Zambia), this expansion allows the LECB Programme to cover a wider range of national circumstances and priorities, while simultaneously allowing it to gather global experiences and lessons learned in the areas of NAMA, LEDS, MRV and mitigation actions.

Phase I countries have completed their project design and are embarking on project implementation, while newly added countries are in the midst of initial stakeholder meetings and stocktaking exercises in order to prepare their project proposals. National projects are slated to engage in a variety of objectives including development of national greenhouse gas emission inventory systems, NAMA formulation, and development of MRV systems to support implementation and evaluation of NAMAs and LEDS, to name a few. It is expected that all Phase I participating countries will be fully engaged on project implementation by the end of the year. This two-phase roll-out has enabled the Global Support Unit, as well as the Global Steering Committee to learn from the initial phase and better tailor its guidance to countries recently joining the Programme.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • ƒƒ Develop greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory management systems;
  • ƒƒ Elaborate opportunities for nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs);
  • ƒƒ Design low emission development strategies (LEDS) in the context of national priorities;
  • ƒƒ Design systems for measuring, reporting, and verifying proposed actions and means to reduce GHG emissions;
  • ƒƒ Facilitate the design and adoption of mitigation actions by selected industries (in some countries)

The overall objectives of the programme are to strengthen the capacity of developing countries to monitor, report and verify greenhouse gas emissions; to identify opportunities for Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the context of national development; and to support the design of low-emission development strategies (LEDS) and to facilitate the uptake of mitigation actions by selected sectors, with the participation of the private sector, as appropriate, taking into account national priorities and circumstances and national economic plans. To achieve these objectives, national teams are supported by a Global   Support Unit, located at UNDP headquarters in New York. The Global Support Unit provides targeted guidance throughout the inception phase and further supports country teams by providing appropriate training based on country needs, technical backstopping, dissemination of knowledge products and lessons  learned, and individual guidance and support reaching national and international stakeholders.

As an integrated part of UNDP’s Green Low Emission Climate Resilient Strategies team, the LECB Global Support Unit connects countries with the larger low carbon landscape to help them identify innovative policy and financing options for low-emission development and to facilitate partnerships between public and  private sectors, in addition to supporting project implementation.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Yamil Bonduki
UNDP
Rebecca Carman
UNDP
Francisco Avendano
UNDP
Allison Towle
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
dc
Project Status: 

Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC)

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) is part of a partnership between the United Nations and sub-national governments for fostering climate friendly development at the sub-national level. This partnership is a collaborative effort involving UNDP, UNEP and eight associations of regions.

The TACC project will support the integration of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures into sustainable development planning and programming in developing countries by:

  1. Developing partnerships with UN and specialised agencies, national and sub-national governments, centres of excellence and regional technical institutions, and the private sector;
  2. Making available methodologies and tools for long-term climate change participatory planning to regions and cities and sharing best practices;
  3. Providing regions with information about climate change challenges and opportunities and technical and financial solutions;
  4. Providing technical support to up to 20 regions for the preparation of regional climate change plans, including identification of priority mitigation and adaptation measures; and
  5. Providing technical support to up to 20 regions to identify policy and financing instruments to implement priority climate change measures.

For more information on project activities read the TACC - 2011 Update or the TACC - 2012 Update.

Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-21.4801 -8.29677)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The beneficiaries of the Down to Earth TACC project are sub‐national authorities who seek technical assistance in understanding and responding to climate change.
Funding Source: 
About: 

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) project aims to assist regional and local governments in developing countries in:

  • Developing integrated climate change strategies and action plans to assess development options that are robust enough to withstand different future climatic conditions.
  • Strengthening capacity of sub‐national authorities to integrate climate change into sustainable development planning and programming.
  • Identifying no regrets/negative costs/low‐cost adaptation and mitigation measures that promote long‐ term sustainability and poverty reduction.
  • Enhancing the capacity of regional and local government to enact regulatory measures, as well as to take advantage of new sources of environmental finance, to implement these no regrets/negative cost/low‐cost options.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Sub-national authorities to have identified risks and opportunities related to climate change at the territorial level and integrated priority mitigation and adaptation measures into sustainable development planning and programming, taking into consideration gender aspects and aligned and coordinated with existing climate change projects in the region.

  • Outcome 1: Partnerships established and operational with UN and specialised agencies, national and sub‐national governments, centres of excellence and regional technical institutions, and/or the private sector.
  • Outcome 2: Methodologies and tools for long‐term climate change participatory planning are developed and made available, and best practices shared with regions and cities.
  • Outcome 3: Regions are aware of climate change challenges and opportunities and of available technical and financial solutions.
  • Outcome 4: Technical support is provided to 20 regions in developing countries for the preparation of their regional climate change plans, including identification of priority mitigation and adaptation measures.
  • Outcome 5: Technical support is provided to 20 regions to identify possible policy and financing instruments to implement priority climate change measures.

 

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Partnerships Bureau
UNDP
Christophe Nuttall
UNDP
Berta Pesti
UNDP
Leslie Ouarzazi
UNDP
Stephen Gold
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
dc
Project Status: 

Climate Change Adaptation in the Cundinamarca Department of Colombia (TACC)

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) is part of a partnership between the United Nations and sub-national governments for fostering climate friendly development at the sub-national level. This partnership is a collaborative effort involving UNDP, UNEP and eight associations of regions.

In Colombia the TACC project is working in Cundinamarca to support the integration of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures into sustainable development planning and programming. The project aims to support capacity building of national and regional authorities in order to integrate climate change into territorial planning and programming, thereby developing, through a capacity building process, a sub-national Level Low Emissions Climate Change Resilience Development Strategy (LECRDS).

In Colombia, project staff have established the partnership and coordination structures referenced in Step 1: Developing a multi-stakeholder planning process. Now they are working on Step 2: Climate change physical impact and vulnerability scenarios with the preparation of climate scenarios underway. Step 3 will identify strategic options leading to low emission climate-resilient development trajectories, via a case study at the municipal level. The project is currently collaborating in the formulation of the National Climate Change Adaptation Plan, in service of Step 4: Identify Policies and Financing options to implement priority Climate Change Actions. Finally, Step 5 will result in the preparation of a low emission climate resilient development roadmap.

Click here for more information on the Overall TACC Project.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-74.0478485082 4.91581758613)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The beneficiaries of the Down to Earth TACC project are sub‐national authorities who seek technical assistance in understanding and responding to climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
USD $650,000 [Government of Spain US$ 400.000 and Quebec US$ 250.000]
Co-Financing Total: 
Expected USD $500,000
About: 

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) project aims to assist regional and local governments in developing countries in:

  • Developing integrated climate change strategies and action plans to assess development options that are robust enough to withstand different future climatic conditions.
  • Strengthening capacity of sub‐national authorities to integrate climate change into sustainable development planning and programming.
  • Identifying no regrets/negative costs/low‐cost adaptation and mitigation measures that promote long‐ term sustainability and poverty reduction.
  • Enhancing the capacity of regional and local government to enact regulatory measures, as well as to take advantage of new sources of environmental finance, to implement these no regrets/negative cost/low‐cost options.

UNDP provides support to the regional government and several national institutions to develop the Integrated Territorial Climate Plan for the Capital Region of Colombia (Bogota District and the Department of Cundinamarca). 

The project aims to support capacity building of national and regional authorities in order to integrate climate change into territorial planning and programming, thereby developing, through a capacity building process, a sub-national Level Low Emissions Climate Change Resilience Development Strategy (LECRDS).

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Main activities to date

Step 1: Develop a multi-stakeholders planning process

Partnership engagement and coordination structure: Project Coordination Unit established and 11 public institutions engaged in the project Steering Committee. 6 technical working groups have been set, relying on the project’s capacity development goal. These groups are: i) Analysis of regional dynamics; ii) Climate change scenarios and analysis of climate variability; iii) GHG inventory; iv) Vulnerability Assessment; v) Territorial planning; vi) Education strategy and knowledge management. About 130 professionals from partner institutions are engaged in these different groups. In this first phase of the process, it was considered crucial to strengthen inter-institutional relations. An advisory committee comprised of multi-stakeholders will be established in March 2012.

Step 2: Prepare Climate Change Profiles and Vulnerability Scenarios.

Climate scenarios downscaled at a sub-national level are being developed, with the assistance of Columbia University/NASA, using the Change Factor Method. Periods: 2030, 2040, 2070, 2100 and gas emissions scenarios: A2, A1B, B1. For February 2012, a climate variability analysis and short-term projections (ENSO phenomenon) will also be available. A particular territorial vulnerability assessment model has been developed and implementation is underway, climate related disaster records are included in the analysis. For the GHG emissions inventory, information on 5 main emitting sectors is being collected, according to the IPCC guidelines (1996, 2006).

Step 3: Identify Strategic Options Leading to Low Emissions Climate –Resilient Development Trajectories.

The construction of the regional climate change education strategy has started. The strategy aims to raise awareness among the public and decision makers about development approaches needed to ensure territorial security on the face of climate change. Key values were identified: identity, responsibility, equity and solidarity. Regarding the integration of climate related risk management in territorial planning instruments, a set of guidelines will be identified and put into practice through a case study at a municipal level.

Step 4: Identify Policies and Financing options to implement priority Climate Change Actions.

A regional dynamics analysis will help better understand the opportunities and challenges to implement strategic mitigation and adaptation options. Efforts have also been focused in positioning the project at a regional and national level, seeking to link the project results and lessons learned with national methodologies and guidelines that are being developed by the authorities. The project is currently collaborating with DNP and MAVDT in the formulation of the National Climate Change Adaptation Plan.

Step 5: Prepare Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Roadmap.

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Main activities (as of September 2011)

Step 1: Develop a multi-stakeholders planning process

Partnership engagement and coordination structure: Project Coordination Unit established and 11 public institutions engaged in the project Steering Committee.  6 technical working groups have been set, relying on the project’s capacity development goal. These groups are: i) Analysis of regional dynamics; ii) Climate change scenarios and analysis of climate variability; iii) GHG inventory; iv) Vulnerability Assessment; v) Territorial planning; vi) Education strategy and knowledge management. About 130 professionals from partner institutions are engaged in these different groups. In this first phase of the process, it was considered crucial to strengthen inter-institutional relations.  An advisory committee comprised of multi-stakeholders will be established in March 2012.

Step 2: Prepare Climate Change Profiles and Vulnerability Scenarios.

Climate scenarios downscaled at a sub-national level are being developed, with the assistance of Columbia University/NASA, using the Change Factor Method. Periods: 2030, 2040, 2070, 2100 and gas emissions scenarios: A2, A1B, B1. For February 2012, a climate variability analysis and short-term projections (ENSO phenomenon) will also be available. A particular territorial vulnerability assessment model has been developed and implementation is underway, climate related disaster records are included in the analysis. For the GHG emissions inventory, information on 5 main emitting sectors is being collected, according to the IPCC guidelines (1996, 2006).

Step 3: Identify Strategic Options Leading to Low Emissions Climate –Resilient Development Trajectories.

The construction of the regional climate change education strategy has started. The strategy aims to raise awareness among the public and decision makers about development approaches needed to ensure territorial security on the face of climate change. Key values were identified: identity, responsibility, equity and solidarity.  Regarding the integration of climate related risk management in territorial planning instruments, a set of guidelines will be identified and put into practice through a case study at a municipal level.

Step 4: Identify Policies and Financing options to implement priority Climate Change Actions.

A regional dynamics analysis will help better understand the opportunities and challenges to implement strategic mitigation and adaptation options. Efforts have also been focused in positioning the project at a regional and national level, seeking to link the project results and lessons learned with national methodologies and guidelines that are being developed by the authorities. The project is currently collaborating with DNP and MAVDT in the formulation of the National Climate Change Adaptation Plan.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Reis Lopez Rello
UNDP
Jimena Puyana
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
dc
Project Status: 

Climate Change Adaptation in the Canelones, Montevideo and San Jose Regions of Uruguay (TACC)

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) is part of a partnership between the United Nations and sub-national governments for fostering climate friendly development at the sub-national level. This partnership is a collaborative effort involving UNDP, UNEP and eight associations of regions.

UNDP provides support to the three departments of the Metropolitan Region of Uruguay and several national institutions in developing its first Integrated Territorial Climate Plan. The Region comprises the departments of Montevideo (capital city), Canelones and San José, where almost two thirds of the national population live. The Territorial Approach to Climate Change pilot project aims to support capacity building of national and regional authorities and other key stakeholders in order to integrate climate change into territorial planning and programming, thereby developing a sub-national level Low Emissions Climate Change Resilience Development Strategy (LECRDS). The purpose of the project is also to identify risks and opportunities related to climate change, collectively building appropriate responses and accessing different sources of financing for climate change. 

Click here for more information on the Overall TACC Project.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-56.1621154835 -34.8859409623)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The beneficiaries of the Down to Earth TACC project are sub‐national authorities who seek technical assistance in understanding and responding to climate change.
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
USD $690,000 [Basque Government USD 40.000, ART-GOLD Trust Fund USD 400.000 and Province of Québec USD 250.000]
About: 

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) project aims to assist regional and local governments in developing countries in:

  • Developing integrated climate change strategies and action plans to assess development options that are robust enough to withstand different future climatic conditions.
  • Strengthening capacity of sub‐national authorities to integrate climate change into sustainable development planning and programming.
  • Identifying no regrets/negative costs/low‐cost adaptation and mitigation measures that promote long‐ term sustainability and poverty reduction.
  • Enhancing the capacity of regional and local government to enact regulatory measures, as well as to take advantage of new sources of environmental finance, to implement these no regrets/negative cost/low‐cost options.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Summary of results: The project started in the three departments of Montevideo, San Jose and Canelones, in the second semester of 2009. The TACC project in Uruguay is well advanced in the fourth step of the establishment of a sub-national LECDRS. Inter-institutional arrangements and local working groups have been created. GHG emissions inventory, impact maps and downscaled climate modeling have been developed. Participatory identification and prioritization of adaptation and mitigation options is finished. Cost-benefit analysis is underway. Two adaptation and local development projects have been designed: one currently under implementation (EU funds, EUR 330.000) and another project proposal for early actions to access additional sources of funding has been pre-selected (EU funds, EUR 275.000). The establishment of the LECDRS is expected to be completed by 2012 subject to the availability of funds.

Main activities to date:

Step 1: Develop a multi-stakeholders planning process

The project started with the signature of a Memorandum of Understanding signed by the three sub-national level Governments and four Ministries, which provide an inter-institutional framework from its outset. The establishment and consolidation of the multi-stakeholders working groups for each local government took place during the first two years of the project. In particular, the Coordination Climate Change Committee for Montevideo was formalized by a resolution from the government in September 2010. Representative from 6 key directorates were officially assigned by the Governor to participate and lead this committee to support the establishment of the local LECDRS. At the local level, key representatives from private sector and civil society were also engaged in the the multi-stakeholders planning process, such as rural associations, transport and energy companies, environmental and social NGOs, and research institutions focused on climate, energy and agriculture. Almost 30 workshops have been successfully completed during 2010 for diagnosis, capacity-building, identification and prioritization of actions, involving the participation of 700 experts and representatives. The working groups have identified strategic lines, specific actions and projects to be included in the work plans.

Step 2: Prepare Climate Change Profiles and Vulnerability Scenarios.

The development of the metropolitan GHG Emission Inventory was successfully completed at the beginning of the Project, with ICLEI support. The results show that the main source of GHG emissions is the burning of fossil fuel in Montevideo, which significantly differs from the main source at the national level, which comes from agriculture. The Project also benefited by the downscaling of Global Climate Models (the two extremes: BAU and global cooperation towards sustainable development) to high temporal (3 hours) and spatial (5km) resolutions based on historical data, precipitation and temperature for three periods of time, provided by CLIMSAT, and by the analysis of these data performed by climatologists from the University of the Republic. Impact maps for the assessment of the present and future vulnerability were built with a participatory methodology as an indirect mechanism to identify vulnerable areas to climate change in the territory. These maps have been classified according to coastal, rural and urban zones.

Step 3: Identify Strategic Options Leading to Low Emissions Climate –Resilient Development Trajectories.

Measures to be included in the metropolitan and departmental action plans have been participatory identified in the local working groups, with orientation given by renowned national and foreign experts. These groups have identified more than 500 measures which differ significantly in terms of sectors, timing and resources needed. This group of actions has been systematized according to strategic lines, programmes and projects of short, medium and long term. Based on this systematization, and the economic and legal prefeasibility studies currently underway, the working groups are completing the final phase of prioritization.

Step 4: Identify Policies and Financing options to implement priority Climate Change Actions.

The Integrated Territorial Climate Plan will serve as a framework to access different sources of financing, such as national and departmental budgets, bilateral and multilateral funds, and/or funding from the private sector. Departmental Governments are already assigning, even before the plan is finalized, resources to implement a group of early actions identified during the process, such as strengthening water supply for small rural producers facing drought forecasts. Additionally, two adaptation and local development projects have been submitted for international financing. The first relates to sustainable family dairy production; the second to native species nurseries managed by rural women and young population. The former is currently under implementation; the latter has been pre-selected and is awaiting final approval.

Step 5: Prepare Low Emission Climate Resilient Development Roadmap.

The design and consultation phase for the development of the LECDRS is expected to be completed by 2012. In the final year, the focus will shift to implementation of additional early actions activities and drafting of project profiles and documents to access other sources of financing.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Reis Lopez Rello
UNDP
Federico Ferla
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
dc
Project Status: 

Climate Change Adaptation in the Delta State of Nigeria (TACC)

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) is part of a partnership between the United Nations and sub-national governments for fostering climate friendly development at the sub-national level. This partnership is a collaborative effort involving UNDP, UNEP and eight associations of regions.

In December 2009, Delta State of the Federal Republic of Nigeria signed a Memorandum of Understanding on TACC with UNDP as part of its efforts to tackle environmental devastation arising from climate change. Being an oil and gas producing state, Delta State is well positioned to seize opportunities from climate change mitigation actions. At the same time, being a coastal state, Delta State is particularly vulnerable to sea water rise and therefore has to develop a strategy to analyze the present and future vulnerability of the state.

The design of the Delta TACC has taken the unique situation of the state as an oil production state into account and the needs and overall objectives of the State Government. Delta State expects that the partnership with UN through TACC and other programmes and organisationswill assist the state government in developing capacity to assess the level of environmental damage caused by oil pollution and rising sea level. Delta State considers the Delta TACC as a strategic initiative that can assist the government in carrying out an environmental diagnosis, which reviews the state of the environment, including the impacts of oil and gas production activities and land use on ecosystems.

The TACC Nigeria project will support the integration of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures into sustainable development planning and programming in developing countries by:

  • Establishing partnership, coordination and participation platform for climate change planning and programming;
  • Building capacity to integrate climate change issues into regional development plans and actions;
  • Formulating an Integrated Territorial Climate Plan (ITCP);
  • Formulating a climate change policy and investment package, i.e., a portfolio of CC adaptation and mitigation policy and investment projects to be implemented by combining and sequencing different financial opportunities; and
  • Producing and disseminating lessons learned & best practices within and beyond Nigeria.

Click here for more information on the Overall TACC Project.

Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (5.77880859375 6.00945316308)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The beneficiaries of the Down to Earth TACC project are sub‐national authorities who seek technical assistance in understanding and responding to climate change.
Funding Source: 
About: 

 

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) project aims to assist regional and local governments in developing countries in:

  • Developing integrated climate change strategies and action plans to assess development options that are robust enough to withstand different future climatic conditions.
  • Strengthening capacity of sub‐national authorities to integrate climate change into sustainable development planning and programming.
  • Identifying no regrets/negative costs/low‐cost adaptation and mitigation measures that promote long‐ term sustainability and poverty reduction.
  • Enhancing the capacity of regional and local government to enact regulatory measures, as well as to take advantage of new sources of environmental finance, to implement these no regrets/negative cost/low‐cost options.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

 

The overall objective of the project, namely supporting low-carbon and climate change-resilient local development in Nigeria, will be achieved by supporting local decision-makers and planners to design integrated climate change (adaptation and mitigation) policies, strategies and formulate concrete actions and investment plans that promote long-term sustainability and poverty reduction in the context of local / regional development.

  • Output 1. Partnership, coordination and participation platforms for climate change planning and programming established
  • Output 2. Capacity to integrate climate change issues into regional development plans and actions built
  • Output 3. Integrated Territorial Climate Plan (ITCP) formulated
  • Output 4. Climate change policy and investment package developed
  • Output 5. Lessons learned and best practices disseminated
Contacts: 
UNDP
Benoit Lebot
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
dc
Project Status: 

Climate Change Adaptation in the Mbale region of Uganda (TACC)

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) is part of a partnership between the United Nations and sub-national governments for fostering climate friendly development at the sub-national level. This partnership is a collaborative effort involving UNDP, UNEP and eight associations of regions.

The TACC Uganda project will support the integration of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures into sustainable development planning and programming in developing countries by:

  • Establishing partnership, coordination and participation platform for climate change planning and programming;
  • Building capacity to integrate climate change issues into regional development plans and actions;
  • Formulating an Integrated Territorial Climate Plan (ITCP) for the Mbale region;
  • Formulating a climate change policy and investment package, i.e., a portfolio of CC adaptation and mitigation policy and investment projects to be implemented by combining and sequencing different financial opportunities; and
  • Producing and disseminating lessons learned & best practices within and beyond Uganda.'

Click here for more information on the Overall TACC Project.

Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (32.9589843665 2.04302396452)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
The beneficiaries of the Down to Earth TACC project are sub‐national authorities who seek technical assistance in understanding and responding to climate change.
Funding Source: 
About: 

The Down to Earth: Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) project aims to assist regional and local governments in developing countries in:

  • Developing integrated climate change strategies and action plans to assess development options that are robust enough to withstand different future climatic conditions.
  • Strengthening capacity of sub‐national authorities to integrate climate change into sustainable development planning and programming.
  • Identifying no regrets/negative costs/low‐cost adaptation and mitigation measures that promote long‐ term sustainability and poverty reduction.
  • Enhancing the capacity of regional and local government to enact regulatory measures, as well as to take advantage of new sources of environmental finance, to implement these no regrets/negative cost/low‐cost options.
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

The overall objective of the project, namely supporting low-carbon and climate change-resilient local development in Uganda, will be achieved by supporting local decision-makers and planners to design integrated climate change (adaptation and mitigation) policies, strategies and formulate concrete actions and investment plans that promote long-term sustainability and poverty reduction in the context of local / regional development.

  • Output 1. Partnership, coordination and participation platforms for climate change planning and programming established
  • Output 2. Capacity to integrate climate change issues into regional development plans and actions built
  • Output 3. Integrated Territorial Climate Plan (ITCP) formulated
  • Output 4. Climate change policy and investment package developed
  • Output 5. Lessons learned and best practices disseminated
Contacts: 
UNDP
Akiko Yamamoto
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
dc
Project Status: