Improving resilience of vulnerable coastal communities to climate change in Viet Nam

Project Overview

The "Improving resilience of vulnerable coastal communities to climate change in Viet Nam" project seeks to scale-up interventions that have already been tested, to increase the resilience of vulnerable coastal communities to climate change.

Building on ongoing social protection programmes related to housing for the poor and marginalized, the project will incorporate storm and flood resilient design features in new houses, benefiting 20,000 poor and highly disaster-exposed people. As part of an integrated response to managing flood risks, 4,000 hectares of mangroves will be rehabilitated and/or planted to function not only as storm surge buffers, but also to provide ecosystem resources that can support coastal livelihoods.

To support and sustain the impacts of this project - as well as future requisite government policy adjustments that strengthen the resilience of coastal and other communities - climate and economic risk assessments for private and public sector application will be systematized in all 28 coastal provinces of the country.

Expected Outcomes

Output1: Storm and flood resilient design features added to 4,000 new houses on safe sites, benefiting 20,000  poor and highly disaster-exposed people in 100 communes

Output 2: Regeneration of 4,000 hectares of costal mangrove storm surge buffer zones 

Output 3: Increased access to enhanced climate, loss and damage data for  private and public sector application in all 28 coastal provinces of Viet Nam 

Project Details

Levels of Intervention

Community

Source of Funds

Green Climate Fund

Key Implementers

Country Office
National Governments

Funding Amounts

US$29.5 million (GCF grant according to GCF website)
US$11 million (US$8 million from the Ministry of Construction, US$1.4 million from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and US$1.6 million from UNDP according to GCF website)

Project Partners

Green Climate Fund
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Ministry of Planning and Investment (MPI) -- Government of Viet Nam

Introduction

The "Improving resilience of vulnerable coastal communities to climate change in Viet Nam" project seeks to scale-up interventions that have already been tested, to increase the resilience of vulnerable coastal communities to climate change.

Building on ongoing social protection programmes related to housing for the poor and marginalized, the project will incorporate storm and flood resilient design features in new houses, benefiting 20,000 poor and highly disaster-exposed people. As part of an integrated response to managing flood risks, 4,000 hectares of mangroves will be rehabilitated and/or planted to function not only as storm surge buffers, but also to provide ecosystem resources that can support coastal livelihoods.

To support and sustain the impacts of this project - as well as future requisite government policy adjustments that strengthen the resilience of coastal and other communities - climate and economic risk assessments for private and public sector application will be systematized in all 28 coastal provinces of the country.

Project Details

Poor communities living in coastal regions of Viet Nam are adversely impacted by frequent flooding. Each year approximately 60,000 houses in coastal provinces are destroyed or damaged by floods and storms. This is likely to worsen given climate change scenarios.

Resultant economic impacts make it increasingly difficult for vulnerable families to escape the cycle of poverty. With funding from the Green Climate Fund, this project will scale-up already tested interventions to increase the resilience of target communities. Building on ongoing social protection programmes related to housing for the poor and marginalized, the project will incorporate storm and flood resilient design features in new houses benefiting 20,000 poor and highly disaster-exposed people.

As part of an integrated response to managing flood risks, 4,000 hectares of mangroves will be rehabilitated and/or planted to function not only as storm surge buffers, but also to provide ecosystem resources that can support coastal livelihoods. Moreover, to support and sustain the impact of this project, as well as future requisite government policy adjustments that strengthen the resilience of coastal and other communities, the project will systematize climate and economic risk assessments for private and public sector application in all 28 coastal provinces of the country.

Thematic Area: 
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
30 million coastal residents will benefit from improved planning integrating climate risk information, 20,000 people will benefit from climate-resilient housing, and 3,8 million people in the target coastal provinces will benefit from the protection offered by healthy and robust mangrove regeneration. An estimated 1.9 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions will be avoided.
Implementing Agencies & Partnering Organizations: 
Green Climate Fund
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Ministry of Planning and Investment (MPI) -- Government of Viet Nam
Project Status: 
Source of Funds Approval/Endorsement
Location: 
Rural
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$29.5 million (GCF grant according to GCF website)
Co-Financing Total: 
US$11 million (US$8 million from the Ministry of Construction, US$1.4 million from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and US$1.6 million from UNDP according to GCF website)

News

Funding Proposal approved by Green Climate Fund Board: 30 June 2016

VTV4 News covers project, enhancing the resilience of coastal communities to the impacts of climate change, featuring visit of GCF Executive Director, Howard Bamsey. July 5, 2017.

'Green Climate Fund announces $29.5mn project to boost Viet Nam’s climate resilience' - Tuoi Tre News, June 26, 2017. The $29.5 million project was announced during a dialogue between GCF executive director Howard Bamsey and Vietnam’s Ministry of Planning and Investment in Hanoi. Bamsey, who was on his first-ever Vietnam visit, joined local officials in discussing how the Southeast Asian country could take action to achieve climate-resilient development and green growth.

'Green Climate Fund announces project to boost Viet Nam’s climate resilience' - Nhan Dan Online, June 26, 2017. Viet Nam’s Ministry of Planning and Investment, UNDP and the Green Climate Fund announce GCF-funded project to increase the climate resilience of coastal residents.

'Global Green Climate Fund helps coastal communities improve climate resilience' - UNDP, June 26, 2017. More than 500,000 people living in coastal zones in Viet Nam are annually affected by typhoons, many of them very poor and living in unsafe houses. In response, UNDP and the Government of Viet Nam have announced a $29.5 million project, 'Improving the resilience of vulnerable coastal communities to cimate change related impacts in Viet Nam'. “This is a really exciting project with benefits to communities, benefits to the country, and benefits globally,” said H.E Howard Bamsey, GCF Executive Director, who joined leaders of MPI and UNDP to announce the project during his first visit to Viet Nam.
 

Call for public consultation and review of the Environmental and Social Management Plan, UNDP, April 29, 2016.

Key Results and Outputs

Output 1:  Storm and flood resilient design features added to 4,000 new houses on safe sites, benefiting 20,000  poor and highly disaster-exposed people in 100 communes

  • In the flood and typhoon prone areas of coastal of Viet Nam. This project will provide for the additional cost of safety features and improved monitoring (approximately US$2,000/house), to 4,000 houses constructed under the broader government housing programming benefitting the poor. Specifically these include (a) a concrete roof with strengthened bracings and fittings (US$900), (b) reinforced windows, doors and sealing (US$400) (c) improvements to drainage, siting and raising plinths (US$400) and (d) improved monitoring to ensure that the finished product is one that reflects all of the resilience features of the house design (US$300). This will be fully coordinated with the government housing programme, and grant support to beneficiaries will follow the government’s monitoring and disbursement schedule.
  • Risk assessments will be conducted through the established CBDRM mechanism, to ensure that house siting is on a safe location. Links will be made to existing information such as the storm surge maps generated by the Disaster Management Center.
  • The 100 target communes selected for this work will serve as learning hubs for broader dissemination in adjacent communes and provinces. Selection of communes and households to receive support will follow existing government criteria. Criteria and prioritization criteria are further detailed in Annex II: Feasibility Study.
  • Training on engineering innovations for flood and storm resistant housing technologies, and to deliver hands-on advice and guidance to local authorities and affected households on safe and affordable house designs and construction.

Output 2: Regeneration of 4,000 hectares of coastal mangrove storm surge buffer zones using successful evidence-based approaches

  • This project will support regeneration of approximately 4,000 hectares of mangroves, in coastal areas vulnerable to climate change impacts. This project will enable scale up of good practices from various pilots and integrate field proven best practices. Supplementary funds will allow for the application of improved planting and maintenance technologies outlined above, and implement the measures to ensure that livelihoods are maintained (such as relocating communal shrimp ponds to where the pressures on the mangrove stands will be minimized and the shrimp production can be well maintained).
  • Specific sites within the province for project intervention will be identified/assessed through various criteria, namely (a) exposure to climate change induced events (i.e. typhoons, storm surges, sea level rise, coastal flooding), (b) potential for mangrove restoration, and (c) complementarity with ongoing government or partner support to maximize the impact of combined resources. Regeneration and rehabilitation efforts will be implemented in phases. While the techniques to be used are based on best practices of previous mangrove rehabilitation efforts, a phased approach will allow time for further monitoring and assessment of techniques, as well as review of risk mitigation measures. Adjustments will be made as needed to maximize the survival rate.
  • Target communes will set up a community committee incorporating both local government and a cross-section of residents to complete a CBDRM risk assessment and planning process. Additional sessions on coastal mapping, mangrove regeneration and livelihoods maintenance will be added. The community CBDRM plans will therefore include location specific actions to support implementation and maintenance of the mangroves. The project will then roll out mangrove regeneration actions to enable application of improved techniques to increase survival rates. This will be community driven process as part of the commune planning and implementation using the CBDRM process for community mobilization and engagement.

Output 3: Increased access to enhanced climate, loss and damage data for  private and public sector application in all 28 coastal provinces of Viet Nam

  • MARD with assistance of UNDP has worked to establish the first natural disaster loss and damage database, strengthening early warning system design and meteorological service capacity. MONRE with assistance of UNDP has strengthened climate change data and analysis and has completed the Special Report on Extreme Events (SREX) submitted to the IPCC in 2014.  The government has recently developed Viet Nam’s first coastal storm surge maps to improve coastal inundation mapping.
  • MARD and MONRE will make improved information more accessible to government decision makers especially at the sub-national level, on-going national programs and the private sector. This will be done by developing integrated risk maps at the sub-national level using the established methodology that Viet Nam has already been applied to produce maps in 20 out of 63 provinces. Viet Nam will be able to produce risk mapping of the entire coastal area, combing local level knowledge with the best scientific data. Data quality will also be improved by including super-storm and storm surge data based on 2014-2015 models and more accurate sea level rise projections included in the fifth IPCC assessment report. Additional analysis of salt water intrusion zones using new satellite based technology will also be included. Although this data has been developed, or is near finalization, it is not currently being systematically applied by the government at any level.  This would be a transformative change in Viet Nam’s ability to analyze and compare climate change risks in coastal areas.

Programme Meetings and Workshops


Multimedia

NetViet TV coverage on the GCF-funded project to improve resilience of coastal vulnerable communities to climate change impacts

Monitoring and Evaluation


Contacts

UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
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