Early Warning Systems (EWS) for different types of hazards

Improving EWS will enhance the capacity of all appropriate national agencies to deliver early warnings in a timely and effective manner. These projects are designed to help with risk reduction, improved safety, and increased awareness in disaster-prone and climate change-affected regions. The provision and enhancement of observation and monitoring technologies, as well as the capacity building and technical training in how to maintain weather stations and use recorded data, will support communities in becoming more resilient.

These projects seek to create institutions and infrastructure that address such disasters as Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs), wildfires, floods, and other climate-related hazard risks. Providing communities with the knowledge they need to respond to such risks will reduce material losses and threats to human livelihoods, and ultimately it will make the most vulnerable communities more resilient to climate shocks. Lessons learned from these initiatives will enable the scaling-up of early warning systems in regional and sub-regional disaster-prone areas.

Projects

Enhancing Multi-Hazard Early Warning System to Increase Resilience of Uzbekistan Communities to Climate Change Induced Hazards

Frequent and more intense floods, mudflows, landslides, avalanches and other climate change-related disasters in Uzbekistan are putting lives and livelihoods at risk and slowing progress to reach targets outlined in the Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals.

Integrated climate-resilient transboundary flood risk management in the Drin River basin in the Western Balkans (Albania, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro)

The Drin River Basin (DRB) is a transboundary river basin, which is home to 1.6 million people and extends across, Kosovo, the Former Yugoslav Republic Macedonia, Montenegro and Greece. Climate change and climate variability have been increasing the frequency, intensity and impact of flooding in the basin. Historical flood data from the Western Balkans suggests a more frequent occurrence of flood events, attributed to an uneven distribution of precipitation and torrential rain, particularly over the last decade.

Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems in Sierra Leone

The project, "Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems for Climate Resilient Development and Adaptation in Sierra Leone", responds to priorities and actions identified in the NAPA of Sierra Leone which articulate the need for securing, transferring and installing critical technologies, as well as developing the necessary systems for climate change-related information to permeate into decision-making processes.

Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems in Tanzania

This project responds to priorities and actions identified in the NAPA of Tanzania which articulate the need for securing, transferring and installing critical technologies, as well as developing the necessary systems for climate change-related information to permeate into decision-making processes. The technologies required to achieve these aims will increase the capacity of the national early warning network to forewarn and rapidly respond to extreme climate events.

Scaling-up multi-hazard early warning system and the use of climate information in Georgia

The “Scaling-up multi-hazard early warning system and the use of climate information in Georgia” project will reduce exposure of Georgia’s communities, livelihoods and infrastructure to climate-induced natural hazards through a well-functioning nation-wide multi-hazard early warning system and risk-informed local action. The multi-hazard early warning system is an essential element of the country’s climate risk management framework and will serve 1.7 million Georgians currently at risk from climate-induced hazards.

Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems in Gambia

The EWS project in Gambia responds directly to the priorities and actions identified in the NAPA of Gambia. The NAPA articulates the need for securing, transferring and installing critical technologies, as well as developing the necessary systems for climate change-related information to permeate into decision-making processes.

Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems in São Tomé and Príncipe

In response to adaptation technology needs addressed in the NAPA of São Tomé and Príncipe, this project aims at helping this Small Island Developing State (SIDS) secure and transfer critical Early Warning Systems (EWSs) technologies. Expected impacts include benefits for the poor excluded from large protective infrastructure project, and long term planning for land use, agricultural planning and hydro electricity.

Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems to Support Climate-Resilient Development in Cambodia

Cambodia is facing mounting development challenges due to climate change. Longer dry seasons and shorter, more intense rainy seasons are resulting in increased frequency and severity of disasters, including floods and droughts.

Recovery from such events stretches limited public resources and forces shifts in development priorities. At the same time, climate change is also impacting agricultural production, affecting household level income and putting pressure on food security.

Flood Hazard and Climate Risk Management to Secure Lives and Assets in Mali

Flooding and other climate change risks have a severe impact on the people of Mali. Significant flooding events over the past 30 years have impacted over 3 million people, taking lives, destroying infrastructure, causing serious economic losses, and derailing efforts to build more resilient lives and livelihoods.

Supporting Climate Resilience and Transformational Change in the Agriculture Sector in Bhutan

Given its geographic location and mountainous terrain, Bhutan is particularly vulnerable to changes in climate.
 
With the goal enhancing the resilience of smallholder farms, in particular to shifting rainfall patterns and frequent extreme weather events, this project, led by Bhutan's Gross National Happiness Commission, focuses on three complementary outcomes:
 
Promoting resilient agricultural practices in the face of changing climate patterns

Support for Integrated Water Resources Management to Ensure Water Access and Disaster Reduction for Somalia's Pastoralists

Roughly 75% of Somalia’s 14.7 million people live in rural areas, with approximately 60% practicing pastoralism and 15% practicing agriculture. Less than one third of the population has access to clean water.

Climate change is now bringing more frequent, higher intensity droughts and floods, reducing already scare water supplies. Lack of water poses a serious threat to the health, wellbeing and livelihoods of farming and pastoral communities and limits Somalia’s overall economic and social development. Women in rural areas are particularly vulnerable.

Adaptation Initiative for Climate Vulnerable Offshore Small Islands and Riverine Charland in Bangladesh

Because of its geographical location, major rivers and low-lying deltaic terrain, Bangladesh is highly exposed to the impacts of both slow and rapid-onset climate-driven disasters, including sea-level rise, saline intrusion, cyclones, storm surges, floods, extreme heat and droughts.

Strengthening Comoros Resilience Against Climate Change and Variability Related Disaster

The "Strengthening Comoros Resilience Against Climate Change and Variability Related Disaster" project will work to strengthen institutional, policy and regulatory frameworks to integrate climate and disaster risks into planning, improve knowledge and understanding of key climate drivers and natural disasters, and strengthen community resilience to climate-induced disaster risks. UNDP is currently working with the Government of Comoros to develop the project proposal for a US$8.5 million grant from the Global Environment Facility Least Developed Countries Fund.

Strengthening Climate Information and Early Warning Systems for Climate Resilient Development and Adaptation to Climate Change in Guinea-Bissau

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is working with the Government of Guinea-Bissau to ensure a new tranche of US$6 milion from the Global Environment Facility's Least Developed Countries Fund is used to improve climate services and early warning systems in this West African nation.