Advancing medium and long-term adaptation planning in Niger

Project Overview

With financing from the Green Climate Fund (GCF), the "Advancing medium and long-term adaptation planning and budgeting in Niger" project supports the Government of Niger to develop its national plan for climate change adaptation through an iterative process focused on strengthening foundational capacities to ensure that they are institutionalized for long-term sustainability. The project is strengthening institutional and technical capacities for the iterative development of a NAP and integration of climate change adaptation into national and subnational planning and budgeting processes in Niger.
 
With the development of a NAP process, Niger lays the groundwork for the systemic and iterative identification of medium and long-term risks, allowing it to establish adaptation priorities and build out specific activities that ensure no one is left behind in the country’s work to reach the goals outlined through the Paris Agreement and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. As part of the localization of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the NAP process contributes to the formulation of corresponding national climate-responsive indicators and targets.
 
This project is steered by the Executive Secretariat of the National Council of Environment for Sustainable Development (SE/CNEDD) and closely engages with the Ministry of Planning and the Ministry of Finance, as well as key sectoral ministries, national training and research institutions and civil society, including the private sector. 
 
The foundations of this project were built through the preparation of the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) in 2006, with support from UNDP and the GEF. The NAPA identified urgent needs in seven vulnerable sectors through 14 priority adaptation interventions. To move beyond these immediate needs towards a medium-term approach, Niger intends to integrate climate change into medium and long-term development planning and budgeting through the NAP process, under its obligation towards the UNFCCC. This process contributes to ensuring that the country’s long-term development strategy - starting with its Sustainable Development and Inclusive Growth Strategy (SDDCI) and its National Economic and Social Development plans - are based on an understanding of climate-related risks.
 
 
*The designations employed and the presentation of material on this map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations or UNDP concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

Expected Outcomes

Output 1: National mandate, strategy and steering mechanisms are in place and gaps are assessed and addressed
 
Output 2: Preparatory work for the NAP undertaken to develop a knowledge-base and compile a NAP
 
Output 3: NAP implementation facilitated
 
Output 4: Mechanisms for Reporting, Monitoring and Review of NAPs and adaptation progress in place
 
Output 5: Funding strategy for the NAP and CCA is available
 

Project Details

Source of Funds

Green Climate Fund

Key Implementers

National Governments
Non-Governmental Organizations
Private Sector Partners
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Funding Amounts

US$2,997,282

Project Partners

National Council for Environment and Sustainable Development, Government of Niger
Green Climate Fund

Introduction

With financing from the Green Climate Fund (GCF), the "Advancing medium and long-term adaptation planning and budgeting in Niger" project supports the Government of Niger to develop its national plan for climate change adaptation through an iterative process focused on strengthening foundational capacities to ensure that they are institutionalized for long-term sustainability. The project is strengthening institutional and technical capacities for the iterative development of a NAP and integration of climate change adaptation into national and subnational planning and budgeting processes in Niger.
 
With the development of a NAP process, Niger lays the groundwork for the systemic and iterative identification of medium and long-term risks, allowing it to establish adaptation priorities and build out specific activities that ensure no one is left behind in the country’s work to reach the goals outlined through the Paris Agreement and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. As part of the localization of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the NAP process contributes to the formulation of corresponding national climate-responsive indicators and targets.
 
This project is steered by the Executive Secretariat of the National Council of Environment for Sustainable Development (SE/CNEDD) and closely engages with the Ministry of Planning and the Ministry of Finance, as well as key sectoral ministries, national training and research institutions and civil society, including the private sector. 
 
The foundations of this project were built through the preparation of the National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) in 2006, with support from UNDP and the GEF. The NAPA identified urgent needs in seven vulnerable sectors through 14 priority adaptation interventions. To move beyond these immediate needs towards a medium-term approach, Niger intends to integrate climate change into medium and long-term development planning and budgeting through the NAP process, under its obligation towards the UNFCCC. This process contributes to ensuring that the country’s long-term development strategy - starting with its Sustainable Development and Inclusive Growth Strategy (SDDCI) and its National Economic and Social Development plans - are based on an understanding of climate-related risks.
 
 

Project Details

This project addresses the main challenges of integrating climate change adaptation into planning and budgeting, as identified in the NAP Stocktaking Report (2014) and under the framework of the LEG Technical Guidelines on NAPs (2012). These challenges and suggested interventions were confirmed by stakeholder consultations held in August 2016:
 
Limited institutional, functional and technical capacity;
Constrained financial, human and material resources;
Limited synergies and coordination among climate adaptation initiatives;
Weak monitoring and evaluation mechanisms; and
Insufficient data availability, reliability and management.
 
Thus, the challenges are being addressed through an integrated strategy which includes the following:
Output 1 aims to strengthen the NAP and climate change adaptation coordination mechanisms in Niger through facilitating stakeholder and cross-sectoral engagements. This is done with the aim of building long-term capacity to effectively implement the NAP.
Output 2 ensures that adaptation planning is informed by the best available climate and socio-economic information. By providing an appraisal of adaptation options and establishing an evidence-base of existing information; enabling addressing gaps to become easier and more evidence-based.
Output 3 facilitates the integration of climate change adaptation into national development planning and budgeting processes, with a focus on aligning NAPs with national priorities and strategic frameworks.
Output 4 strives to reinforce monitoring and evaluation mechanisms to assess and share the results. It contributes to an integrated national adaptation platform to support the management of easily accessible data. This would also help strengthen the monitoring and evaluation mechanisms for wider development planning.
Output 5 addresses the constraints of the financial resources of the Government of Niger through costing adaptation needs, engaging the private sector, and identify financing opportunities. Particularly for national actors such as the National Implementing Entity (NIE), and local authorities.
 
Context
 
Niger is a Sahelian landlocked country of approximately 18 million people. It mainly consists of savannah, dotted with trees in the southern part and bushes in its northern part. The country was ranked 189 out of 189 in the UNDP’s Human Development Index (HDR, 2019), with nine out of ten people living in multidimensional poverty. In Niger, over 40 percent of the GDP comes from agriculture, forestry and the livestock sectors - which employ 80 percent of the workforce. These sectors are inherently linked to climate and therefore extremely susceptible and vulnerable to climate change. Over the next decades, Niger is expected to experience worsening: (i) droughts, resulting in a decrease in agricultural production, an increase in grazing pressure on pastoral ecosystems, and consequently soil erosion on a mass scale; and (ii) prevalent floods resulting from the heavy rainfall and overflow of rivers. These risks as well as the land-locked nature of Niger make it one of the most climate-vulnerable countries in the world. 
 
NDCs and NAPs
 
The Government of Niger launched its NAP process in May 2014. With support from the UNDP-UNEP NAP-Global Support Programme (GSP), a stocktaking was undertaken to understand the policy gaps and a NAP road map was constructed. The assessment concluded that the NAP process in Niger offers opportunities to generate greater awareness of climate risks at decision-making levels. It can help build institutional capacity for climate change coordination for key actors and address climate risk in long term development planning. The NAP road map detailed activities, and a timeline over a three to five-year period. These activities are aligned with the “Nigeriens Nourish the Nigeriens” Initiative (Initiative 3N), the Sustainable Development and Inclusive Growth Strategy (SDDCI), the National Economic and Social Development Plan (PDES), and the National Climate Learning Strategy. 
In 2016, Niger ratified the Paris Agreement, bringing its first NDC and climate commitments to the Paris Agreement into force. The ‘Sustainable Development and Inclusive Growth Strategy (2035)’, or the ‘2035 Vision’ was adopted in 2016. Both of these national plans recognise the importance for Niger to build resilience; with climate change adaptation at their core. The first NDC lists “National Priorities for Adaptation to Climate Change” and states that the priorities for the AFOLU sector relate to improving the resilience of the agriculture, animal husbandry and forestry sub-sectors. The other priorities concern water resources, fishing, fauna, health and capacity building of the actors at all levels.
Niger is also engaged in UNDP’s Climate Promise - to support at least 100 countries enhance their NDCs by COP26 – and is currently revising its NDC. Niger intends to raise the ambition of both its mitigation as well as its adaptation to goals in its enhanced NDC. Regarding mitigation, specific attention will be paid to land-use, energy and refrigerant gases, with gender equality being a priority that will cross-cut through all NDC activities. This NAP project is complementing this work.
 
Baseline Situation
 
The Government of Niger recognizes the pressing need of tackling climate change to safeguard food security and to reduce poverty. Therefore, the Government of Niger has set up institutional arrangements to address this need. The National Technical Commission on Climate Change and Variability (CNCVC) was set up in July 1997. To coordinate climate change and disaster related interventions, the Government of Niger has also established the National Council on Environment for Sustainable Development (CNEDD) and the National Mechanism for Disaster and Food Crises Prevention and Management (DNPGCCA). The Government has also signed and ratified various international conventions and agreements, such as the three Rio Conventions, the Paris Agreement, and the Sendai Framework for DRR.
 
Stakeholder Consultations
 
To prepare for this project, a stocktaking mission was conducted to review relevant climate change initiatives and to engage and communicate with national stakeholders. 
As part of the government consultations at national level - held in 2014 and 2016 with the support of UNDP - approximately 70 stakeholders were consulted, and 25 interviews and meetings were conducted. During the development of this project, a note was formulated by government and validated through a meeting of the national GCF committee, which is comprised of representatives of SE/CNEDD, Ministries of Planning, Agriculture, Economy, Energy, Finance, High Commission on I3N, and the National Meteorological Institute among others. The Ministries of Finance and Planning and the High Commission for the 3N Initiative were also consulted on the priority interventions of the project. Going forward, stakeholders will be consulted and engaged at all stages, from the launch to implementation and review of the NAP. This is done through sensitization, consultation, and training workshops. Stakeholders represent government institutions, financial and technical partners, international non-governmental organizations, and local civil society. A gender analysis will be conducted to assess the status of gender mainstreaming and to promote gender-responsive adaptation planning.
 
Implementing Agencies & Partnering Organizations: 
National Council for Environment and Sustainable Development, Government of Niger
Green Climate Fund
Location: 
Unspecified
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$2,997,282

Key Results and Outputs

Output 1: National mandate, strategy and steering mechanisms are in place and gaps are assessed and addressed
The NAP process will be relaunched. A Stocktaking will be conducted, available information on climate change impacts will be identified, and vulnerability, adaptation, and gaps will be assessed. Capacity gaps and weaknesses in undertaking the NAP process will be addressed. Development needs and climate vulnerability will be comprehensively and iteratively assessed.
 
Output 2: Preparatory work for the NAP undertaken to develop a knowledge-base and compile a NAP
This activity will start with a stocktaking of available information collected and produced through other initiatives. Additional assessments, analyses and modelling will be produced to complement existing information. Information collected and produced will be made available through the information platform developed under the CNEDD Executive Secretariat through the Africa Climate Change and Food Security Project and supported through the PARC- DAD project. It would also build on research institutes such as the National Agricultural Research Institute and the International Crops Research Institute for semi-arid tropics (ICRISAT).
Current climate, future climate change, and socio-economic scenarios will be analyzed. Climate vulnerabilities will be assessed, and adaptation options at the sector, subnational, national and other appropriate levels will be identified. Adaptation options will be reviewed and appraised. The National Adaptation Plan will be compiled and communicated. Climate change adaptation into national and subnational development and sectoral planning and budgeting will be integrated.
 
Output 3: NAP implementation facilitated
Mainstreaming climate change into planning and budgeting is still at a nascent stage in Niger despite the threat climate change poses to the country’s development. It is still in part considered a sectoral issue and needs to be further integrated into development planning and budgeting, and aligned with national priorities and strategic frameworks, such as the SDDCI, the PDES and the I3N. The NAP process deals with the full integration of climate change concerns and climate risks into planning, budgeting and decision-making processes in all relevant sectors and at all adequate levels. This output will facilitate the NAP implementation, in particular by reinforcing the current budgeting framework, and supporting the integration of CCA into future budgets. It will also include developing an implementation strategy for the NAP.
Climate change adaptation in national planning and budgeting will be prioritized. A national adaptation implementation strategy will be developed. The capacity for planning, budgeting and implementation of adaptation will be enhanced. Coordination and synergy at the regional level and with other multilateral environmental agreements will be promoted.
 
Output 4: Mechanisms for Reporting, Monitoring and Review of NAPs and adaptation progress in place
This output will contribute monitoring, review and updating of adaptation plans over time, to ensure progress and effectiveness of adaptation efforts and to demonstrate how gaps are being addressed. It will also go beyond the NAP, to include monitoring of adaptation interventions into a wider development framework. Activities under this output will also support reports and outreach on the NAP process to stakeholders nationally and internationally vis-a ̀-vis progress on adaptation under the UNFCCC convention.
The capacity to monitor the NAP process and adaptation progress will be enhanced. The NAP process will be reviewed to assess progress, effectiveness and gaps. Outreach will be conducted on the NAP process and report on progress and effectiveness.
 
Output 5: Funding strategy for the NAP and CCA is available
The NAP should serve as an investment framework and as a means of attracting domestic and international funding, both from public and private sources. Adaptation options will be cost, appraised and prioritized, ahead of NAP compilation. This output will also help identify financing sources and opportunities and contribute to enhancing access to climate finance by national actors, especially the national implementing entity (NIE), as well as local authorities.
The costs of meeting integrated adaptation needs will be assessed. Policy and strategic options for scaling up financing for adaptation investments, including through public-private partnerships, will be identified, analyzed, and recommended. Study or research programmes to inform future investments in adaptation across sectors will be conducted.