Addressing Climate Vulnerability in the Water Sector in the Marshall Islands

Project Overview

As with many small island developing states, the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) has had little if anything to do with causing global climate change, but is left to now cope with the consequences. 
 
The country faces worsening droughts, and coastal inundation which can contaminate groundwater resources, resulting in water shortages that have significant economic and social impacts.  Rural communities and households are particularly vulnerable.  
 
This 7-year project (2019-2026) supports the Government to adapt to increasing climate risks, particularly more frequent and extreme droughts, which impact the country’s water supply for drinking, cooking, hygiene and sanitation.
 
The project focuses on:
Improving household and community rainwater harvesting and storage structures to increase resilience of water supply in all outer islands and atolls, accounting for approximately 28% of RMI’s population currently at risk 
Securing groundwater resources from contamination due to inundation caused by wave overtopping of seawater.
Strengthening the technical capacities of national and subnational institutions and key stakeholders to integrated climate change risks into water governance processes so that management of climate change risks are coordinated, effective, participatory, equitable, and sustained over the long-term when risks are expected to worsen.
*The designations employed and the presentation of material on this map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations or UNDP concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

Expected Outcomes

Output 1: Implementation of optimal mix of interventions to ensure climate resilient water security in outer atolls and islands of RMI
Output 2:  Optimization of alternative water sources to reduce reliance on harvested rainwater in the context of reduced rainfall
Output 3: Climate change induced drought preparedness and response measures implemented in outer atolls and islands
 

Project Details

Levels of Intervention

National

Source of Funds

Green Climate Fund

Key Implementers

Country Office
National Governments
Non-Governmental Organizations
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Funding Amounts

US$18.631 million Green Climate Fund grant
US$6.116 million Government of RMI

Project Partners

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Project Dates

2019 to 2026

Introduction

As with many small island developing states, the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) has had little if anything to do with causing global climate change, but is left to now cope with the consequences. 
 
The country faces worsening droughts, and coastal inundation which can contaminate groundwater resources, resulting in water shortages that have significant economic and social impacts.  Rural communities and households are particularly vulnerable.  
 
This 7-year project (2019-2026) supports the Government to adapt to increasing climate risks, particularly more frequent and extreme droughts, which impact the country’s water supply for drinking, cooking, hygiene and sanitation.
 
The project focuses on:
Improving household and community rainwater harvesting and storage structures to increase resilience of water supply in all outer islands and atolls, accounting for approximately 28% of RMI’s population currently at risk 
Securing groundwater resources from contamination due to inundation caused by wave overtopping of seawater.
Strengthening the technical capacities of national and subnational institutions and key stakeholders to integrated climate change risks into water governance processes so that management of climate change risks are coordinated, effective, participatory, equitable, and sustained over the long-term when risks are expected to worsen.

Project Details

July 2019
Green Climate Fund project approval

.

Thematic Area: 
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Level of Intervention: 
Primary Beneficiaries: 
• Outer atoll and island communities (approx. 15,572 direct beneficiaries, including 7,630 women) • Population of RMI (55,226) will benefit indirectly through capacity building and integration of water management into national governance framework.
Implementing Agencies & Partnering Organizations: 
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
Project Status: 
Source of Funds Approval/Endorsement
Location: 
Rural
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
US$18.631 million Green Climate Fund grant
Co-Financing Total: 
US$6.116 million Government of RMI

Key Results and Outputs

Output 1: Implementation of optimal mix of interventions to ensure climate resilient water security in outer atolls and islands of RMI
 
Activity 1.1. Improve existing rainwater harvesting systems for community buildings and households in outer islands and atolls for usage during increasing frequency and periods of drought
 
Activity 1.2. Provide additional rainwater harvesting systems and increase of storage capacity for communities in outer islands and atolls for usage during increasing frequency and periods of drought
 
Output 2:  Optimization of alternative water sources to reduce reliance on harvested rainwater in the context of reduced rainfall
 
Activity 2.1. Protect groundwater wells from more frequent climate change induced storm surges and contaminations
 
Activity 2.2. Enhance women and youth’s leadership through best practices and community awareness programmes on efficient usage (demand management) of rainwater
 
Output 3: Climate change induced drought preparedness and response measures implemented in outer atolls and islands
 
Activity 3.1. Update national-level contingency plans and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for climate change induced drought response
 
Activity 3.2. Develop and implement community-level drought contingency planning in outer islands and atolls
 

Monitoring and Evaluation

Project results are monitored and reported annually and evaluated periodically during project implementation. Monitoring and evaluation is undertaken in compliance with the UNDP POPP and the UNDP Evaluation Policy.
 
The primary responsibility for day-to-day project monitoring and implementation rests with the Project Manager. The UNDP Pacific Office in Fiji will support the Project Manager as needed, including through annual supervision missions.  
 
A Project Implementation Report will be prepared for each year of project implementation.  
 
An independent Mid-Term Review will be undertaken and the findings and responses outlined in the management response will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s duration.  
 
An independent Terminal Evaluation will take place no later than three months prior to operational closure of the project and will be made available to the public via UNDP’s Evaluation Resource Centre.
 
The UNDP Pacific Office will retain all M&E records for this project for up to seven years after project financial closure.  

Contacts

Jose Padilla
Regional Technical Advisor